NEWSPAPER ARCHIVE OF
Lassen County Times
Susanville, California       More Newspaper Titles
December 19, 2000
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14A Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2000 R, tmm Attack: most leave on busses Continued from page 1 In the scuffle that followed in the ladies room, Hearne said Porter's nose was bro- ken, and he evefltually fled the building. He was arrested on the street nearby. Hearne said because Porter's pants were down, he probably intended to commit a sexual assault, 'but he didn't get anything accom- plished." Criticizes prison policy Hearne said she's con- cerned about the policy at Su- sanville's prisons, High Desert State Prison and the California Correctional Cen- ter, which she says "dumps prisoners off in Reno at the rate of 2,000 per year." The attorney said the pris- ons used to give the prisoners a ticket to the county in which they committed their offense, but now they get "a free ride to Reno and cash." Hearne said the tickets home are much better than the cash. "There must be an answer," Hearne said. "We're very con- cerned that now there may be another prison built and then the number of prisoners com- ing to Reno will .increase. Enough is enough." Hearne said it's not hard to imagine an ex-felon released in Reno with cash in his pock- et might be tempted to stay in the Nevada city, and that's a temptation that can lead to a confrontation between an ex- felon from California and citi- zens of Nevada. Give the Times for Christmas. Call 257-5321. Terry Thorton, a spokeswoman for the Califor- nia Department of Correc- tions in Sacramento, said her department didn't want to sound unsympathetic to the complaints of Nevada citi- zens, but the department doesn't have a lot of options. She said Reno was the clos- est "transportation hub" to the prisons in Susanville and "if there was a bus stop clos- er, we'd send them there." concernced that now there may be another prison built and then the number of prisoners going to Reno will increase." Treva J. Hearne Reno attorney According to Thornton, the law requires ex-felons be paroled in the county where they committed their crime or the county of their last le- gal residence. She said the ex-felons are required to report to parole agents at their parole loca- tions quickly, usually within 24 or 48 hours, depending up- on how long it will take them to travel back home. The ex-felons released at Susanville's prisons are or- dered to get on the bus or on a plane and go home. Thornton said she wasn't familiar with Porter's case, but if he had spent two days in Reno before the assault he probably vio- lated his parole by not obey- ing the order to go home and not reporting to his parole agent in a timely manner. Russ Heimerieh, a "-. spokesman for the DepaH:- ment of Corrections in Sacra- mento, said the department works closely with the Reno Police Department regarding the transportation of prisons to Reno. He said the prisons supply information on the ex- felons and their itinerary, as well as photographs. Heimerich said most pris- oners are picked up at the prisons by friends or family members upon their parole, and he thought Hearne's esti- mate of 2,000 ex-felons being released to Reno each year was too high. "Most of the inmates we re- lease in Reno are transported to the bus station, and then they get on the bus like they're supposed to. We've been doing this for years, and by and large it's working well." But Heimerich conceded there is always a possibility of having "one or two bad players" who will cause prob- lems wherever d':ey go. "This is the story of an indi- vidual who didn't do what he was supposed to do," Heimerich said. "The parole clock stops when he was ar- rested in Nevada. I imagine he'll face additional time in California for violating his parole. So he's going to have to face the music in Nevada, and when he gets done there he's going to have to face the music in California." ccc defends ns po4 Marty Ashton, a public in- formation officer at Califor- nia Correction Center echoed Thornton's and Heimerich's comments. He said ex-felons released at CCC board public trans- portation buses at the prison and are transported the bus station or the airport in Reno. The ex-fens are instructed to stay at those transporta- tion centers until they begin their journey back home. "I can understand the con- cern they have in Nevada,"Ashton said. "I can understand why they're upset about this." Nevadans ask Cal to stop 'dumping' i Alleged victim seeking lengthy sentence, By Sam Williams Staff Writer A Reno woman allegedly assaulted in an of- flee building's ladies room by an ex-felon re- cently released by Susanville's High Desert State Prison is trying to make sure her attacker spends a long time behind bars. The victim also is asking the governors of Nevada and Califor- nia to end the practice that turned her attacker loose on the streets of Reno. A copy of a letter &L IIllhere is a the victim wrote to the Washoe County II feeling deputy district at- torney who is prose- someone is curing her attacker reads: lurking and I Dear Ms. Heron: have to check This is in refer- ence to the sentenc- every room put ing of Tyrone Bernard Porter. on every light, For people like and even check him, where violence is a way of life, it behind the was just another way to get some shower quick money• But for me, it has forev- curtains." er changed my life. It may have hap- A][e0e d pened a couple of Ren0 victim weeks ago, but ev- ery time I go into the ladies room or walk into my apartment, there is the feeling someone is lurking and I have to check every room, put on every light, and even check behind the shower curtains. He has scared me forever. It was not right what he did to me, and I want to make sure that he doesn't do it to anyone else. He should get the maximum that is allowed and then throw This never should have happened. the outrageous policy that is Desert State Prison in Susanville, Porter was given some money to Reno, Nev. The policy at the shuttle the discharged inmates few dollars in their pocket with no the severity of their sentence gard for the people who live in Reno. This is the crime and something $":, done about it• Maybe my case is only opt. a hundred inmates released, but the not even be that one. Something shO mU about the policy at the SusanvilleV.: Therefore, enclosed is a petition, names to start the process to change ' at the High Desert State Prison. Petition asks for change The petition being circulated in "We the residents of the state of tired of being the dumping of California. We the residents mand that you, the state of sponsible for your decisions to Ex-Felons and not place the Nevadans. "We the residents of Nevada, no the state of California to Felons, specifically, those been recently released from the rectional Center and the High Prison from Susanville, California. "We the residents of the state of: quest that the state of California, relocate those Ex-Felons, due to they have no home, family, or other] be sent back to their place of have the county in which there were convicted, take responsibility Suit: could impact some servi Continued from page 1 The loss of potential tax dol- lars to the county is estimated at $70,000 per year and could impact the services residents have come to expect. But the city of Susanville could generate as much as $49 million during the life of pro- ject estimated at 45 years. Jon Huffman, vice president of Urban Futures told the city council in January that state laws allow redevelopment to help reverse the deteriorating physical and economic condi- tions of blight in urban areas. California Community Re- development law defines blight as conditions such as buildings in which it is unsafe or unhealthy for persons to live or work, inadequate streets, sidewalks and sewers, and depreciated or stagnant property values. Redevelopment erate on tax ing. The agency any new property within area is sold. Comments from cials concerning to ?-fie - dt by unavailable at press urday, Dec. 16. YrLooal Plumas Satellites .urL.al ,, DISH'Netw. ork DISH | e tW. el ,,u .ou 0onnec,,on Something,tier everyone,, conn00,00 ATTENTION CABLE CUSTOMERS Non-Cable Customers can also qualify! Get a I DISH Network Interactive Satellite 11/System, Installed FREE! + 3 Months of 28 Movie Channels FREE! Limited Time Only (with this ad) Get Your 2nd Dish Net Receiver FREE! Only S49" installation on your 2nd receiver. Your Cable Bill is Worth Over $605 ® . 2rid ReceiveT Your Local DISH Network Contortion PLUMAS SATELLITES 1-800-434-7428 InstallatJofl * Sales * sarvice BIB: 5964267 * Hank: 284-7463 DISH Network O I G I TAt L DyNA M I TE BLOWS C,'.ble Awa " SarSand* the first consumer, tw.wa 9 sae In4[errvel servk;e to deriver connexion vuallg evergwhme, Plus, the Sar'Sa dish amenna s caoable of receivtnl[ OtSH Networ  sae Much more fun than ties and chocolates, now isn't it? High-speed Inernet w:ess ffOl the sk Just Io uP " Your Local DISH Network Connection PLUMAS SATELLITES 1-800-434-7428 Installation * Sales * Service Open 7 days a week til 8 pm Hh 5g4? * Hank: 284-7463 Pl" good Im Jan. 31 st 14A Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2000 mm Attack: most leave on busses Continued from page 1 In the scuffle that followed in the ladies room, Hearne said Porter's nose was bro- ken, and he evefltually fled the building. He was arrested on the street nearby. Hearne said because Porter's pants were down, he probably intended to commit a sexual assault, 'but he didn't get anything accom- plished." Criticizes prison policy Hearne said she's con- cerned about the policy at Su- sanville's prisons, High Desert State Prison and the California Correctional Cen- ter, which she says "dumps prisoners off in Reno at the rate of 2,000 per year." The attorney said the pris- ons used to give the prisoners a ticket to the county in which they committed their offense, but now they get "a free ride to Reno and cash." Hearne said the tickets home are much better than the cash. "There must be an answer," Hearne said. "We're very con- cerned that now there may be another prison built and then the number of prisoners com- ing to Reno will .increase. Enough is enough." Hearne said it's not hard to imagine an ex-felon released in Reno with cash in his pock- et might be tempted to stay in the Nevada city, and that's a temptation that can lead to a confrontation between an ex- felon from California and citi- zens of Nevada. Give the Times for Christmas. Call 257-5321. Terry Thorton, a spokeswoman for the Califor- nia Department of Correc- tions in Sacramento, said her department didn't want to sound unsympathetic to the complaints of Nevada citi- zens, but the department doesn't have a lot of options. She said Reno was the clos- est "transportation hub" to the prisons in Susanville and "if there was a bus stop clos- er, we'd send them there." concernced that now there may be another prison built and then the number of prisoners going to Reno will increase." Treva J. Hearne Reno attorney According to Thornton, the law requires ex-felons be paroled in the county where they committed their crime or the county of their last le- gal residence. She said the ex-felons are required to report to parole agents at their parole loca- tions quickly, usually within 24 or 48 hours, depending up- on how long it will take them to travel back home. The ex-felons released at Susanville's prisons are or- dered to get on the bus or on a plane and go home. Thornton said she wasn't familiar with Porter's case, but if he had spent two days in Reno before the assault he probably vio- lated his parole by not obey- ing the order to go home and not reporting to his parole agent in a timely manner. Russ Heimerieh, a "-. spokesman for the DepaH:- ment of Corrections in Sacra- mento, said the department works closely with the Reno Police Department regarding the transportation of prisons to Reno. He said the prisons supply information on the ex- felons and their itinerary, as well as photographs. Heimerich said most pris- oners are picked up at the prisons by friends or family members upon their parole, and he thought Hearne's esti- mate of 2,000 ex-felons being released to Reno each year was too high. "Most of the inmates we re- lease in Reno are transported to the bus station, and then they get on the bus like they're supposed to. We've been doing this for years, and by and large it's working well." But Heimerich conceded there is always a possibility of having "one or two bad players" who will cause prob- lems wherever d':ey go. "This is the story of an indi- vidual who didn't do what he was supposed to do," Heimerich said. "The parole clock stops when he was ar- rested in Nevada. I imagine he'll face additional time in California for violating his parole. So he's going to have to face the music in Nevada, and when he gets done there he's going to have to face the music in California." ccc defends ns po4 Marty Ashton, a public in- formation officer at Califor- nia Correction Center echoed Thornton's and Heimerich's comments. He said ex-felons released at CCC board public trans- portation buses at the prison and are transported the bus station or the airport in Reno. The ex-fens are instructed to stay at those transporta- tion centers until they begin their journey back home. "I can understand the con- cern they have in Nevada,"Ashton said. "I can understand why they're upset about this." Nevadans ask Cal to stop 'dumping' i Alleged victim seeking lengthy sentence, By Sam Williams Staff Writer A Reno woman allegedly assaulted in an of- flee building's ladies room by an ex-felon re- cently released by Susanville's High Desert State Prison is trying to make sure her attacker spends a long time behind bars. The victim also is asking the governors of Nevada and Califor- nia to end the practice that turned her attacker loose on the streets of Reno. A copy of a letter  ilher e is a the victim wrote to the Washoe County II feeling deputy district at- torney who is prose- someone is curing her attacker reads: lurking and I Dear Ms. Heron: have to check This is in refer- ence to the sentenc- every room put ing of Tyrone Bernard Porter. on every light, For people like and even check him, where violence is a way of life, it behind the was just another way to get some shower quick money• But for me, it has forev- curtains." er changed my life. It may have hap- A][e0e d pened a couple of Ren0 victim weeks ago, but ev- ery time I go into the ladies room or walk into my apartment, there is the feeling someone is lurking and I have to check every room, put on every light, and even check behind the shower curtains. He has scared me forever. It was not right what he did to me, and I want to make sure that he doesn't do it to anyone else. He should get the maximum that is allowed and then throw This never should have happened. the outrageous policy that is Desert State Prison in Susanville, Porter was given some money to Reno, Nev. The policy at the shuttle the discharged inmates few dollars in their pocket with no the severity of their sentence gard for the people who live in Reno. This is the crime and something $":, done about it• Maybe my case is only opt. a hundred inmates released, but the not even be that one. Something shO mU about the policy at the SusanvilleV.: Therefore, enclosed is a petition, names to start the process to change ' at the High Desert State Prison. Petition asks for change The petition being circulated in "We the residents of the state of tired of being the dumping of California. We the residents mand that you, the state of sponsible for your decisions to Ex-Felons and not place the Nevadans. "We the residents of Nevada, no the state of California to Felons, specifically, those been recently released from the rectional Center and the High Prison from Susanville, California. "We the residents of the state of: quest that the state of California, relocate those Ex-Felons, due to they have no home, family, or other] be sent back to their place of have the county in which there were convicted, take responsibility Suit: could impact some servi Continued from page 1 The loss of potential tax dol- lars to the county is estimated at $70,000 per year and could impact the services residents have come to expect. But the city of Susanville could generate as much as $49 million during the life of pro- ject estimated at 45 years. Jon Huffman, vice president of Urban Futures told the city council in January that state laws allow redevelopment to help reverse the deteriorating physical and economic condi- tions of blight in urban areas. California Community Re- development law defines blight as conditions such as buildings in which it is unsafe or unhealthy for persons to live or work, inadequate streets, sidewalks and sewers, and depreciated or stagnant property values. Redevelopment erate on tax ing. The agency any new property within area is sold. Comments from cials concerning to ?-fie - dt by unavailable at press urday, Dec. 16. YrLooal Plumas Satellites .urLoeal ,, DISH'Netw. ork DISH | e tW.Ol  .oh Connect,on 5omething +ft00r everyone,. ConnectiOn ATTENTION CABLE CUSTOMERS Non-Cable Customers can also qualify! Get a I DISH Network Interactive Satellite TV System, Installed FREE! + 3 Months of 28 Movie Channels FREE! Limited Time Only (with this ad) Get Your 2nd Dish Net Receiver FREE! Only S49" installation on your 2nd receiver. Your Cable Bill is Worth Over $605 ® . 2rid ReceiveT Your Local DISH Network Com',ecUon PLUMAS SATELLITES 1-800-434-7428 Installation * Sales * Service BIB: 596..4267 * Hank: 284-7463 DISH Network O I G I TAt L DyNA M I TE BLOWS C,'.ble Awa " S(arand* the first conmmer, two.wa 9 sa,tte In[errvel vice to deliver connection vuallg erie, Pus, the 5argand dish antenna is capable of receng  Network,  Much more fn than ties and chocolates, now isn't it? High-speed Inernet access from the sk..k.,st  uP "" Your Local DISH Network Connection PLUMAS SATELLITES 1-800-434-7428 Installation * Sales • Service Open 7 days a week t# 8 pm BIB: 596-4267 * Hank: 284-7463