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Lassen County Times
Susanville, California
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November 14, 2000     Lassen County Times
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November 14, 2000
 

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From page one Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2000 15A 1 37 Percent. with college em- took 2O She cap- Health pro- Gould took the educa- Deal Promote pro- wants for cul- :aptain Lassen = town - for qual- said he to priority three new faces voted in in office. Likewise, Dow, a rancher and former Shaffer Elemen- tary School Board member, said the college "must have a reputation for excellence ined- ucation." In Trustee Area 4, Dow cap- tured 44 percent of the vote. He won with 4,038 votes. Eagle took 37 percent with 3,481 votes. Former County Supervi- sor Helene M. Williams gar- nered almost 18 percent. She took 1,612 votes. In Trustee Area 5, 68 percent of voters chose Blevins. He took 6,304 votes. Yochem won 31 percent with 2,863 votes. "While the board does well to avoid micro-managing the district, it likewise must avoid delegating its solemn responsi- bility to the electorate by be- coming a rubber stamp for dis- trict administration," Blevins said in a candidate statement published in the Oct. 24 Lassen County Times. "The chief responsibility of the board is to be accountable to the public, not to an admin- istrator," according to the re- tired Lassen College automo- tive instructor. Board micro-management and inability to work with the Takes over from Yochem in Area 5 administration was the main cause of the accreditation pro- bation imposed in June 1996 by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. The commission of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges voted to lift that probation in June 1999 after the entire campus com- munity worked together to im- prove. The WASC stamp of ap- proval qualifies the college for state funding and ensures that courses transfer to other schools. An accreditation team will visit the campus again in 2002. "These past four years we've worked together as a team," Trout said, adding that she re- ally enjoyed her years on the board. "I hope the newly-elect- ed board members will contin- ue the positive direction." Peele get married Wed ,ug 5, Mc- eat Linn, an ivory and .ss Style Her made ses With a garde- as maid Jen- Nev. of Su- Wore a Wore silk at the all car. The groom's best man was Taylor Hicks, of Auburn, Ala. His groomsmen were Rob- bie Eckert, of Birming- ham, Ala., Jackie Laird, of Auburn, Ala., , and the groom's broth- ers, Brad and Shannon Scarbough, of Home- wood, Ala. The groom and groomsmen wore charcoal grey tuxedos with light grey pants and grey and black silk ties. The bride walked up the isle to the song "Tupelo Honey" sung by the best man. The reception, also held in the garden, immediatel)cfol- lowed the ceremony. ARer the e t e caie honey- mooned in Jamaica. They have settled in Lake Oswego, Ore. Lisa is a 1997 graduate of Lassen High School and is em- ployed by Moore Communica- tions in Portland, Ore. Her Usa Ann Emory al Chdstoph Poolo parents are Steve and Jan" Emory of Standish, Calif. Christoihcr recey graduat- ed from the Pond Culinary Institute and is employed by Blinn's Boathouse Restaurant. His parents are Lynn and Cindy Scarbrough of Flower Branch, Ga. FEDERALCREDIT UNION Making Your List And . Checking It Twice Do you have more people on your list than funds permit? You need a holiday loan! "a00ial good until December 31, 2000 up to 12 months to repay Gas: officials pleased with tally Continued from page I sanville. Mayor Mary Fahlen said she was pleased with the results. "Obviously, I'm pleased with the outcome of the election," Councilmember Vern Temple- ton agreed. "It gives the city the opportunity to get back on track and get natural gas to the city." A distribution system could be under con- struction in just a few months, Susanville City Administrator Newell Sorensen said the day after the Tuesday, Nov. 7 election. "It's full speed ahead," Sorensen said. "We proceed with the (City Council) direction to bring natural gas to the city. I have the first cut of the plans. They're under review by the rs ' engmee The city administrator said he expects the council to authorize going to bid by the first of the year for construction of the distribution system. The schedule Sorensen reviewed on Wednes- day, Nov. 8, calls for construction to start in the spring and customers to begin receiving natural gas in the fall of 2001. Plans depend on the Tuscarora Natural Gas Transmission Company building a natural gas pipeline into Susanville from its transmission line located 17.5 miles east of the city. Sierra Pacific Power Company formed Tus- carora to bring inexpensive Canadian gas to its Tracy, Nev., power plant. "It will depend on how soon Tuscarora brings the line in," the city administrator said. "We have to talk with them before we have anything definite about when we'll bring gas in." The city agreed to pay Tuscarora transporta. tion charges to bring 1,150 decatherms of natu- ral gas a day into the city, according to the terms of a memorandum of understanding ap- proved in March. The MOU calls for the Cali- fornia Department of Corrections to receive 1,600 decatherms a day to serve Susanville prisons. Sorensen said he must work out a schedule with Tuscarora and prison officials. That con- ference is not yet scheduled. "Until last night," Sorensen said on Nov. 8, "I didn't have the go ahead to proceed. I'll be scheduling that meeting soon." A natural gas feasibility study completed last year by Sunrise Engineering of Filmore, Utah. said the city utility could break even on a natural gas distribution system estimated to cost $15.7 million dollars. However, at least 65 percent of city residents must convert to natu- ral gas for the utility to remain solvent. Pezzullo said support for natural gas did not reach the 65 percent level at the ballot box. "We don't know how many were homeown- ers, how many were business owners," he said, questioning whether the utility will at- tract the necessary conversion rate. Early this year, the council agreed to have t(edwood Securities Group sell $1.67 million in Certificates of Participation to pay for design of the distribution system. The city pledged a geothermal well that serves the California llm   nUl last night I didn't V have the go ahead to proceed. I'll be scheduling that meeting soon." Newell Sorenson City Administrator Correctional Center to back the bond. Fearing financial disaster, Citizens for Open Government demanded public records in May on the Susanville natural gas project, and the city airport, water and geothermal systems. Pezzullo cited "the recent council vote in which only three members voted in favor of borrowing almost $1.7 million to continue funding with Sunrise" as the source of COG's concern. "A group of concerned residents decided to request public information to determine why the council was so split, and if they are leading Susanville into a major financial disaster," he said in May. The committee headed by former City Coun- cil member Bing Bengtson, then submitted a ballot argument claiming city records show losses of more than $360,000 on the three exist. ing city enterprises. "Does the voter wish to entrust this manage. ment with a $24,000 natural gas project?" the ballot argument asked. Voters last week an- swered yes with a solid majority. The ballot measure asked if the ordinance "stating that the City of Susanville be prohibit. ed from acquiring, owning operating, control. ling and/or using a natural gas transmittal/supply system within or outside the City of Susanville be adopted?" Even on election night, Sorensen said people were having trouble figuring out that those in favor of receiving natural gas must vote no on Measure W. "The proponents obviously worded it in such a manner that it would be confusing," the city administrator said. Pezzullo leveled his own accusation against the city, claiming it spent $10,000 on a cam- paign in support of natural gas through news- paper advertisements and fact sheets that were mailed to city residents. State law prohibits the city from advertising for or against any ballot measure. However, nothing in state law prevents an educational campaign about the benefits of conversion to natural gas. Sorensen said the city spent $1,970,45 on the fact sheet sent to city residents. It also spent $1,278 to have the fact sheet printed in the pa- per. Spending on both totaled $3,248.45. However, Pezzullo said he planned to pre- sent a b!ic records request at the Wednes- day, Nov. 15 council meeting for information about spending on the fact sheet and "where the money came from." Room & Shopping Package Through  24, 2000 For only $39 per night for a Tower Room* - or mr from $79 for a luxurious Jacuzzi suite* - you can let the Peppermill F-,ani you while you do your holiday shopping! tan/round-trip shuttle service to Macy's ^ special gift whm you shop = Macy's Exclusive Macy's coupon book Free Macy's package ddivery to your room complimemry   for up ofn, e Macy's purchases /mmwn service (Macy's cu=omers o) $1o off'European facials and m=s_,,es at the Peppem To wrap up this special rate, just call: 888-826-6774 I'ePInermill From page one Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2000 15A 1 37 Percent. with college em- took 2O She cap- Health pro- Gould took the educa- Deal Promote pro- wants for cul- :aptain Lassen = town - for qual- said he to priority three new faces voted in in office. Likewise, Dow, a rancher and former Shaffer Elemen- tary School Board member, said the college "must have a reputation for excellence ined- ucation." In Trustee Area 4, Dow cap- tured 44 percent of the vote. He won with 4,038 votes. Eagle took 37 percent with 3,481 votes. Former County Supervi- sor Helene M. Williams gar- nered almost 18 percent. She took 1,612 votes. In Trustee Area 5, 68 percent of voters chose Blevins. He took 6,304 votes. Yochem won 31 percent with 2,863 votes. "While the board does well to avoid micro-managing the district, it likewise must avoid delegating its solemn responsi- bility to the electorate by be- coming a rubber stamp for dis- trict administration," Blevins said in a candidate statement published in the Oct. 24 Lassen County Times. "The chief responsibility of the board is to be accountable to the public, not to an admin- istrator," according to the re- tired Lassen College automo- tive instructor. Board micro-management and inability to work with the Takes over from Yochem in Area 5 administration was the main cause of the accreditation pro- bation imposed in June 1996 by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. The commission of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges voted to lift that probation in June 1999 after the entire campus com- munity worked together to im- prove. The WASC stamp of ap- proval qualifies the college for state funding and ensures that courses transfer to other schools. An accreditation team will visit the campus again in 2002. "These past four years we've worked together as a team," Trout said, adding that she re- ally enjoyed her years on the board. "I hope the newly-elect- ed board members will contin- ue the positive direction." Peele get married Wed ,ug 5, Mc- eat Linn, an ivory and .ss Style Her made ses With a garde- as maid Jen- Nev. of Su- Wore a Wore silk at the all car. The groom's best man was Taylor Hicks, of Auburn, Ala. His groomsmen were Rob- bie Eckert, of Birming- ham, Ala., Jackie Laird, of Auburn, Ala., , and the groom's broth- ers, Brad and Shannon Scarbough, of Home- wood, Ala. The groom and groomsmen wore charcoal grey tuxedos with light grey pants and grey and black silk ties. The bride walked up the isle to the song "Tupelo Honey" sung by the best man. The reception, also held in the garden, immediatel)cfol- lowed the ceremony. ARer the e t e caie honey- mooned in Jamaica. They have settled in Lake Oswego, Ore. Lisa is a 1997 graduate of Lassen High School and is em- ployed by Moore Communica- tions in Portland, Ore. Her Usa Ann Emory al Chdstoph Poolo parents are Steve and Jan" Emory of Standish, Calif. Christoihcr recey graduat- ed from the Pond Culinary Institute and is employed by Blinn's Boathouse Restaurant. His parents are Lynn and Cindy Scarbrough of Flower Branch, Ga. FEDERALCREDIT UNION Making Your List And . Checking It Twice Do you have more people on your list than funds permit? You need a holiday loan! "a00ial good until December 31, 2000 up to 12 months to repay Gas: officials pleased with tally Continued from page I sanville. Mayor Mary Fahlen said she was pleased with the results. "Obviously, I'm pleased with the outcome of the election," Councilmember Vern Temple- ton agreed. "It gives the city the opportunity to get back on track and get natural gas to the city." A distribution system could be under con- struction in just a few months, Susanville City Administrator Newell Sorensen said the day after the Tuesday, Nov. 7 election. "It's full speed ahead," Sorensen said. "We proceed with the (City Council) direction to bring natural gas to the city. I have the first cut of the plans. They're under review by the rs ' engmee The city administrator said he expects the council to authorize going to bid by the first of the year for construction of the distribution system. The schedule Sorensen reviewed on Wednes- day, Nov. 8, calls for construction to start in the spring and customers to begin receiving natural gas in the fall of 2001. Plans depend on the Tuscarora Natural Gas Transmission Company building a natural gas pipeline into Susanville from its transmission line located 17.5 miles east of the city. Sierra Pacific Power Company formed Tus- carora to bring inexpensive Canadian gas to its Tracy, Nev., power plant. "It will depend on how soon Tuscarora brings the line in," the city administrator said. "We have to talk with them before we have anything definite about when we'll bring gas in." The city agreed to pay Tuscarora transporta. tion charges to bring 1,150 decatherms of natu- ral gas a day into the city, according to the terms of a memorandum of understanding ap- proved in March. The MOU calls for the Cali- fornia Department of Corrections to receive 1,600 decatherms a day to serve Susanville prisons. Sorensen said he must work out a schedule with Tuscarora and prison officials. That con- ference is not yet scheduled. "Until last night," Sorensen said on Nov. 8, "I didn't have the go ahead to proceed. I'll be scheduling that meeting soon." A natural gas feasibility study completed last year by Sunrise Engineering of Filmore, Utah. said the city utility could break even on a natural gas distribution system estimated to cost $15.7 million dollars. However, at least 65 percent of city residents must convert to natu- ral gas for the utility to remain solvent. Pezzullo said support for natural gas did not reach the 65 percent level at the ballot box. "We don't know how many were homeown- ers, how many were business owners," he said, questioning whether the utility will at- tract the necessary conversion rate. Early this year, the council agreed to have t(edwood Securities Group sell $1.67 million in Certificates of Participation to pay for design of the distribution system. The city pledged a geothermal well that serves the California llm   nUl last night I didn't V have the go ahead to proceed. I'll be scheduling that meeting soon." Newell Sorenson City Administrator Correctional Center to back the bond. Fearing financial disaster, Citizens for Open Government demanded public records in May on the Susanville natural gas project, and the city airport, water and geothermal systems. Pezzullo cited "the recent council vote in which only three members voted in favor of borrowing almost $1.7 million to continue funding with Sunrise" as the source of COG's concern. "A group of concerned residents decided to request public information to determine why the council was so split, and if they are leading Susanville into a major financial disaster," he said in May. The committee headed by former City Coun- cil member Bing Bengtson, then submitted a ballot argument claiming city records show losses of more than $360,000 on the three exist. ing city enterprises. "Does the voter wish to entrust this manage. ment with a $24,000 natural gas project?" the ballot argument asked. Voters last week an- swered yes with a solid majority. The ballot measure asked if the ordinance "stating that the City of Susanville be prohibit. ed from acquiring, owning operating, control. ling and/or using a natural gas transmittal/supply system within or outside the City of Susanville be adopted?" Even on election night, Sorensen said people were having trouble figuring out that those in favor of receiving natural gas must vote no on Measure W. "The proponents obviously worded it in such a manner that it would be confusing," the city administrator said. Pezzullo leveled his own accusation against the city, claiming it spent $10,000 on a cam- paign in support of natural gas through news- paper advertisements and fact sheets that were mailed to city residents. State law prohibits the city from advertising for or against any ballot measure. However, nothing in state law prevents an educational campaign about the benefits of conversion to natural gas. Sorensen said the city spent $1,970,45 on the fact sheet sent to city residents. It also spent $1,278 to have the fact sheet printed in the pa- per. Spending on both totaled $3,248.45. However, Pezzullo said he planned to pre- sent a b!ic records request at the Wednes- day, Nov. 15 council meeting for information about spending on the fact sheet and "where the money came from." Room & Shopping Package Through  24, 2000 For only $39 per night for a Tower Room* - or mr from $79 for a luxurious Jacuzzi suite* - you can let the Peppermill F-,ani you while you do your holiday shopping! tan/round-trip shuttle service to Macy's ^ special gift whm you shop = Macy's Exclusive Macy's coupon book Free Macy's package ddivery to your room complimemry   for up ofn, e Macy's purchases /mmwn service (Macy's cu=omers o) $1o off'European facials and m=s_,,es at the Peppem To wrap up this special rate, just call: 888-826-6774 I'ePInermill