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Lassen County Times
Susanville, California
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November 14, 2000     Lassen County Times
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November 14, 2000
 

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 uaay, NOV. 14,200U cm@ Child mole,00er gets eight years Defendant pleads to one felony; five others dismissed in plea bargain By Sam Williams Staff Writer A Lassen County child molester will spend the next eight years behind bars in a California state prison. Alan Roe Quinn, 57, pleaded guilty on July 19 to one felony count of committing a lewd act with a child under 14. As part of a plea bargain, two felony child molestation charges and three felony charges of using a minor in an obscene matter were dismissed. Quinn was sentenced Nov. 8 to the high term, despite arguments for a lesser sentence from Rex Gay, his Su- sanville defense attorney. Gay argued that this was really a mid-term case be- cause the probation department overstated the aggravat- ing circumstances and understated the mitigating cir- cumstances in the case. The defense attorney said contrary to the probation de- partmenrs report, there was "no great bodily injury" or "callousness" involved. He said victims of this type of crime are always vulnerable, and this should not be a cri- teria in Quinn's sentencing. He also argued that Quinn had a long, well-known his- tory of alcoholism and a nickname of "Bottleman." Gay pointed out Quinn had a single previous criminal convic- tion in which he successfully completed probation. While Gay conceded this was a "heinous offense," he said the court was "not following the rules" in consider- ing what Quinn's sentence should be. Gay also noted that Quinn admitted his guilt early and cooperated with law enforcement officers investigating the case. But Judge Ridgley Lazard told Gay he had not consid- ered the aggravating circumstances the defense attorney complained were unfair. Lassen County Deputy District Attorney Dan Howe said the court should consider the seriousness of the crime, despite the plea bargain. Howe said there were rive victims in this case, one as young as eight years old. He said Quinn provided the mi- nors with alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana, which showed "sophistication and planning." He pointed out that Quinn had committed more than one act with the children and encouraged sexual acts be- tween them, which Quinn then videotaped. Lazard denied Quinn's request for probation because of the multiple victims and because the acts continued for SiX months. - According to the probation report, former Lassen County Deputy Sheriff Dennis Robinson contacted Quinn "in response to possible telephonic threats." Robinson said Quinn told him the victims were threat- ening to say he molested them unless he provided them In response to Robinson's questioning, Quinn allegedly showed the deputy a videotape of Quinn and some of the victims Performing sexual acts. According to Robinson's report, Quinn had a number of similar videos. Based on that information, Robinson obtained a search warrant for the residence and Quinn was then taken into custody. H0timteci Professional Pmnters00L . with 2.0 qear's experience i-I'lolidaq Special q .. Interior bedroom I/- }l I Paint 3 Rooms and the I  KoQn , ,/- vrr I Exterior 0 intArrlor professional Palnt.m I|lml Call Us .-- . -Clinics celebrate 23 With humble beginnings as a small clinic in CedarviUe in 1977, Northeast- ern Rural Health Clinics, Inc., this month celebrates 23 years of service to the people of Lassen County. Also during November, Northeast- ern will be approaching the Lassen County community to help it ensure and prepare for its next 20 years of quality health care services to all, re- gardless of ability to pay. Friends and patients of Northeastern will receive a mailing asking them to consider mak- ing a donation to its inaugural equip- ment fundraising drive. Northeastern is a private, not-for-profit community benefit organization whose mission is to provide quality comprehensive pre- ventive and accessible health care ser. vices, regardless of ability to pay, and to meet the changing needs of its com- munity with creativity and innovation. Janet Lasick, CEO of Northeastern announced, "By late 2003, Northeastern has plans to build a new facility unit- ing all of our Susanville sites in the new health care park which Lassen Community Hospital is now in the pro- cess of developing. The new site will make services more convenient and ac- cessible, and make room for additional medical and dental health care providers." Northeastern's clinics moving to the health care park include: Lassen Fami- ly Practice, Lassen Women's Health Center, Lassen Family Urgent Care, Northeastern Occupational Medicine, Lassen Family Dental Practice, Great Basin Primary Care, and corporate of- rices. "We now have a staff of 85," said Medical Director, Dr. Paul Holmes, "in- cluding a medical staff of five physi- cians, five nurse physician assistants, nurse midwife/nurse also have one de "We take pride in care provider to over County's residents, record of doing all we the health of our people. The new facilitY improving health services area." Northeastern is teer board of directors, gin Cannon of Susanville. directors represents the and Northeastern "We want to thank its support over the non, "and we look 23 years of providing vices to our com] Patrols to help prevent in Lassen Volcanic National ] 'ark officials say they 'simF,1 This fall Lassen Volcanic National Park rangers have increased boundary patrols to protect the park wildlife from illegal hunting. Evidence of poaching with- in the park such as hunting stands, salt licks and bait sta- tions have been found. Hunting stands are perches connected high on a tree or other advantage point and are comouflaged. Salt licks and bait stations entice wildlife to an area to be illegally killed. "We simply will not tolerate hunting inside the park," said Superintendent Marilyn H. Parris. "The National Park Service mission is to protect animals and natural processes as well as preserving our na- tion's cultural and historical resources within park bound- aries. Our patrols have been very effective at intercepting illegal hunters and we want people to know that we are out there watching." Ranges have made approxi- mately 200 hunting safety and awareness contacts this year and will investigate all evi- dence of poaching within the park. Based on this year's investi- gations, we expect to issue vi- r will not tolerate' YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE If you have a heart for children and want to make a positive impact on a child's life, call Mountain Circle. We have children of all ages in need of short-term, long term and fost-adopt homes. We look forward to sharing information about our program, the special children that we serve and the support our agency provides. Greenville - 284-7007 • Susanville - 257-7407 • Quincy - 283-5437 Loyalton - 993-1744 • Lic. # 320308986 olation notices for illegal hunt- ing. These boundary patrols are in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, California Department of Fish and Game, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, and Na- tional Park Service special agents. Hunting in a national park carries a maximum penalty of one year in prison and up to $100,000 in fines. Possession of a loaded fLrearm in a national park carries a maximum penalty of six months in prison and up to $10,000 in fines. Hunters sponsible cation of andfor and hunting. dogs they ff their the park, whether or physically bodm"Y' For this issue, Ranger 5150. Weight Watchers is Now the plan everyone's talking aboUt is  On 1,2,3 Success. our easiest food you crave and still ’ Try our whole new the I 0% difference". : . Corn, :, ,, , d,,,,;m;,:,d ' s, I>,J, #, Communi W Meeting SerieS. OPEN Thursday, November 30r 140 S. Lassen St. Monticola Club Susanville 33P.00 13P,. TREE SERVICE and Pest Control 257-7400 m Served with baked potato, beans, salad, french bread & wine. PER PERSON CHILDREN HALF PRICE Proceeds to Benefit Elk's Charities Lassen Community Hospital Auxiliary Presents Friday, December 1 5:30 p.m. Msgr. Moran Hall (viewing of Christmas items from 1-3 p.m. $3.00) Tickets: $10 per person (Available from the Hospital Gift Shop or Auxiliary Members) Hors d'oeuvres & Champagne Auction Of- Decorated Christmas Trees, Centerpieces, & Wreaths (All proceeds for the Chapel at the new Lassen Community Hospital opening Fall 2002) • Commercial • New Roofs • Continuous Gutters • Vinyl Windows • Residential • Metal Composition • Siding .I  uaay, NOV. 14,200U cm@ Child mole,00er gets eight years Defendant pleads to one felony; five others dismissed in plea bargain By Sam Williams Staff Writer A Lassen County child molester will spend the next eight years behind bars in a California state prison. Alan Roe Quinn, 57, pleaded guilty on July 19 to one felony count of committing a lewd act with a child under 14. As part of a plea bargain, two felony child molestation charges and three felony charges of using a minor in an obscene matter were dismissed. Quinn was sentenced Nov. 8 to the high term, despite arguments for a lesser sentence from Rex Gay, his Su- sanville defense attorney. Gay argued that this was really a mid-term case be- cause the probation department overstated the aggravat- ing circumstances and understated the mitigating cir- cumstances in the case. The defense attorney said contrary to the probation de- partmenrs report, there was "no great bodily injury" or "callousness" involved. He said victims of this type of crime are always vulnerable, and this should not be a cri- teria in Quinn's sentencing. He also argued that Quinn had a long, well-known his- tory of alcoholism and a nickname of "Bottleman." Gay pointed out Quinn had a single previous criminal convic- tion in which he successfully completed probation. While Gay conceded this was a "heinous offense," he said the court was "not following the rules" in consider- ing what Quinn's sentence should be. Gay also noted that Quinn admitted his guilt early and cooperated with law enforcement officers investigating the case. But Judge Ridgley Lazard told Gay he had not consid- ered the aggravating circumstances the defense attorney complained were unfair. Lassen County Deputy District Attorney Dan Howe said the court should consider the seriousness of the crime, despite the plea bargain. Howe said there were rive victims in this case, one as young as eight years old. He said Quinn provided the mi- nors with alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana, which showed "sophistication and planning." He pointed out that Quinn had committed more than one act with the children and encouraged sexual acts be- tween them, which Quinn then videotaped. Lazard denied Quinn's request for probation because of the multiple victims and because the acts continued for SiX months. - According to the probation report, former Lassen County Deputy Sheriff Dennis Robinson contacted Quinn "in response to possible telephonic threats." Robinson said Quinn told him the victims were threat- ening to say he molested them unless he provided them In response to Robinson's questioning, Quinn allegedly showed the deputy a videotape of Quinn and some of the victims Performing sexual acts. According to Robinson's report, Quinn had a number of similar videos. Based on that information, Robinson obtained a search warrant for the residence and Quinn was then taken into custody. H0timteci Professional Pmnters00L . with 2.0 qear's experience i-I'lolidaq Special q .. Interior bedroom I/- }l I Paint 3 Rooms and the I  KoQn , ,/- vrr I Exterior 0 intArrlor professional Palnt.m I|lml Call Us .-- . -Clinics celebrate 23 With humble beginnings as a small clinic in CedarviUe in 1977, Northeast- ern Rural Health Clinics, Inc., this month celebrates 23 years of service to the people of Lassen County. Also during November, Northeast- ern will be approaching the Lassen County community to help it ensure and prepare for its next 20 years of quality health care services to all, re- gardless of ability to pay. Friends and patients of Northeastern will receive a mailing asking them to consider mak- ing a donation to its inaugural equip- ment fundraising drive. Northeastern is a private, not-for-profit community benefit organization whose mission is to provide quality comprehensive pre- ventive and accessible health care ser. vices, regardless of ability to pay, and to meet the changing needs of its com- munity with creativity and innovation. Janet Lasick, CEO of Northeastern announced, "By late 2003, Northeastern has plans to build a new facility unit- ing all of our Susanville sites in the new health care park which Lassen Community Hospital is now in the pro- cess of developing. The new site will make services more convenient and ac- cessible, and make room for additional medical and dental health care providers." Northeastern's clinics moving to the health care park include: Lassen Fami- ly Practice, Lassen Women's Health Center, Lassen Family Urgent Care, Northeastern Occupational Medicine, Lassen Family Dental Practice, Great Basin Primary Care, and corporate of- rices. "We now have a staff of 85," said Medical Director, Dr. Paul Holmes, "in- cluding a medical staff of five physi- cians, five nurse physician assistants, nurse midwife/nurse also have one de "We take pride in care provider to over County's residents, record of doing all we the health of our people. The new facilitY improving health services area." Northeastern is teer board of directors, gin Cannon of Susanville. directors represents the and Northeastern "We want to thank its support over the non, "and we look 23 years of providing vices to our com] Patrols to help prevent in Lassen Volcanic National ] 'ark officials say they 'simF,1 This fall Lassen Volcanic National Park rangers have increased boundary patrols to protect the park wildlife from illegal hunting. Evidence of poaching with- in the park such as hunting stands, salt licks and bait sta- tions have been found. Hunting stands are perches connected high on a tree or other advantage point and are comouflaged. Salt licks and bait stations entice wildlife to an area to be illegally killed. "We simply will not tolerate hunting inside the park," said Superintendent Marilyn H. Parris. "The National Park Service mission is to protect animals and natural processes as well as preserving our na- tion's cultural and historical resources within park bound- aries. Our patrols have been very effective at intercepting illegal hunters and we want people to know that we are out there watching." Ranges have made approxi- mately 200 hunting safety and awareness contacts this year and will investigate all evi- dence of poaching within the park. Based on this year's investi- gations, we expect to issue vi- r will not tolerate' YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE If you have a heart for children and want to make a positive impact on a child's life, call Mountain Circle. We have children of all ages in need of short-term, long term and fost-adopt homes. We look forward to sharing information about our program, the special children that we serve and the support our agency provides. Greenville - 284-7007 • Susanville - 257-7407 • Quincy - 283-5437 Loyalton - 993-1744 • Lic. # 320308986 olation notices for illegal hunt- ing. These boundary patrols are in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, California Department of Fish and Game, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, and Na- tional Park Service special agents. Hunting in a national park carries a maximum penalty of one year in prison and up to $100,000 in fines. Possession of a loaded fLrearm in a national park carries a maximum penalty of six months in prison and up to $10,000 in fines. Hunters sponsible cation of andfor and hunting. dogs they ff their the park, whether or physically bodm"Y' For this issue, Ranger 5150. Weight Watchers is Now the plan everyone's talking aboUt is  On 1,2,3 Success. our easiest food you crave and still ’ Try our whole new the I 0% difference". : . Corn, :, ,, , d,,,,;m;,:,d ' s, I>,J, #, Communi W Meeting SerieS. OPEN Thursday, November 30r 140 S. Lassen St. Monticola Club Susanville 33P.00 13P,. TREE SERVICE and Pest Control 257-7400 m Served with baked potato, beans, salad, french bread & wine. PER PERSON CHILDREN HALF PRICE Proceeds to Benefit Elk's Charities Lassen Community Hospital Auxiliary Presents Friday, December 1 5:30 p.m. Msgr. Moran Hall (viewing of Christmas items from 1-3 p.m. $3.00) Tickets: $10 per person (Available from the Hospital Gift Shop or Auxiliary Members) Hors d'oeuvres & Champagne Auction Of- Decorated Christmas Trees, Centerpieces, & Wreaths (All proceeds for the Chapel at the new Lassen Community Hospital opening Fall 2002) • Commercial • New Roofs • Continuous Gutters • Vinyl Windows • Residential • Metal Composition • Siding .I