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Susanville, California
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July 18, 2000     Lassen County Times
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PinePress MI0 P Tuesday, July 18, 2000 13C to the editor 11 Voters" they were 18 - 21 year s. The re- : o to say that the evenly split and how is that go- would happen could vote, That would be ex- really shake A new group of a thing. sad to think that ;chools can give same follow. get me wrong! haven't even it is wrong for them before a chance to re- things. They will generation, ff the that are currently all of them send them off to a nuclear ex- 1 SOme freaked out new genera- of nation- evange- belief systems. generation will into their own the vision of of this lnaybe, they will of Liberty, realize the re- }mess. because all me to pass. One , SOme future gen- have to come to that freedom and justice for all, means something other than what they are being offered. They will reject the system that does not deliver, and like the old pioneers, strike out on their own. Of course, they will have to contend with new dan- gers, but they will see a new world. If the Democrats and Repub- licans could deliver, they would have, and I would have not written this letter. But, we'll see what happens in November. James E. Ausmus Susanvllle BASIC CONFUCT WITH SKI RESORT Gosh, I guess some local lads do "make good", moving to the city and making big bucks at something other than being a professional athlete. I'm talk- ing of none other than real es- tate developer "tycoon" and "boy wonder" Briar Tazuk. Thus it was with great interest that my mother, who taught English many years ago at Chico Jr. High and remembers Briar as a good student there, and I read the article on the proposed ski resort near West- wood. Here is my reaction. It sounds like Briar and his associates are trying to be all things to all interested parties in the Westwood area. But I have to agree, however, with local activist Gary Pritchard. There seems to be a basic con- flict between trying to develop a fancy, almost citified "all- year" resort (something along the lines of Vail, Colo.?) and curtail HUSA 11 where the to compete to of Main the the impact When different changes You realize that stores has s. (1999:20 Vs 2000:28) and the Professional category has increased by two (1999:35 Vs 2000:37). These facts cannot be ignored. Financial Support From the city Firstl let's get the facts stated correctly. HUSA is getting financial support from the city. HUSA doesn't get an annual check but the financial support is providing police officers to/- C0nol tlie trafrld dtirg Safe and Sane Halloween and any other events that require being the caretakers of a wilderness area and its endan- gered species. Sure, local peo- ple want to make money, but be careful what you wish for as it might become reality. Just not in the way you hoped for. Briar envisions the West- wood area as being something like Truckee in the Tahoe re- gion. But I question whether the Almanor - Westwood area should be subject to the kind of scene that exists today an.y- where near Lake Tahoe. A lit- fie bit too much tourism, and a few too many tourists! (And the waters of Lake Tahoe are not as crystal clear as they once were). Do we really need that kind of "action" at the far northern end of the Sierra? And perhaps more jobs would be created but: 1) Wouldn't they be relatively low-paying jobs of question- able long-term benefit to those who held them? Plus, 2) A lot of people from outside the area would be competing for them along with the locals (such as the inhabitants of a number of the 1,000 homes that are pro- posed for construction). Thus I would caution West- wood area residents (as some- one who lives in a much larger wooded community that has al- ready been subject to rapid growth) to trust their future to those they have some sort of control over because as of this moment the lamb has never been able to lie down with the lion without being readily de- voured! If it happens in the case of Westwood, it would cer- tainly be a first. Good luck to the citizens and community of Westwood. I think they're going to need it. Jay Castor Paradise SOME BULL SOME NOT Well it is rodeo time again and this oldfnever waser" of- fers a few memories that may be amusing to modern bull riders. Let's take a look at how it was at Susanville in the first half of the 1930s. Instead of the hybrid born to buck bulls that we see in the arena today, it was pretty much Herefords that were commonly used. Spraker and Harwood fur- nished many of these and bucking was not a require- ment in their selection of her sires. What they had in mind was beef production, not un- ride-able rodeo athletes. In fact, the un-ride-able rogues we see today had not yet been "invented." Even with the stimulation of Mas- ten Ramsey's chemical con- coction called high life," which was poured liberally on their tail heads. They were not properly inspired to "turn the crank" as todays bulls do. Add to this the use of bull riggings, which were provided by the rodeo management at that time, and you had a real downer where showmanship was concerned. By way of ex- planation, believe it or not, a bull rigging was somewhat similar in appearance to the bareback rigging as used in the bareback riding event to- day, the main difference being that the bull rigging had two hand holds. Today's bull riders, with their bull ropes used with one hand, might be inclined to wonder if these old boys were serious. As I look back, the an- swer would have to be, "not very." During my high school years, I used to enter this event. Of course I never had reason to believe that they gave prizes. One big reason for this strange phenomenon being that two or more guys like Johnie Scheneider always showed up to skim the cream. Johnie could and did spur, these old things anywhere that he chose, looking back over a shoulder talking to the judges all the while you may very well ask, "why did some of us home guards even en- ter?" To which I can only re- spond, "Such is the optimism of youth." I cannot help but wonder what today's animal rights ac- tivists would have thought about Masten Ramsey's "high life." Guess that it's a little late to think about suing that great old boy. Seems like those were happier days, possibly, because most people were in- clined to mind there own busi- ness. Chub Coffin Janesville, Calif. END OF THE UNE So what do you think of that new intersection at south Fairfield and Riverside Drive? It's sure a beautiful piece of work, but it's an accident waiting to happen. The way it was set up was the best now there's a one way. From the east to west one must cross over to make a left turn - no stop sign 'til you get over the small incline. It's great for dry weather but when bad weather and icy conditions hit, folks will ei- ther get plowed into on River- side Drive or they'll skid across and go down the era- traffm control. The city prepares the quarterly assessment billing, collection of the assessments, and filing small claims action against HUSA delinquent members. I want to remind the readers of this article that the city funded the development of Pancera Plaza. This was only accomplished after the HUSA Board at the time presented a professional proposal to the city for approval. Exerce m.. by the City There is one area that the city has not exercised their authority granted by Streets and Highway Code. HUSA is an advisory beard appointed by the city and exists at the will of the city. Consequently, the city is ultimately responsible to the business Improvement District [BID] members for the administration and authorization of the levy of assessments and the expenditure of the revenue. To the BID members, the City Council represents the first line of defense. The BID members cannot and should not expect less. It is not incumbent on the BID members to raise an insurrection to challenge each Annual Report submitted by HUSA. It is the City Council's responsibility to have the bankment on the other side Then who will be sued, the company that installed it or the city? In most all other citys the traffic lights are in synchro they're set for a certain speed, normally 28 mph. but in our fair little city that's not so. They still need a light at Main and Lassen Street. What's nice about living in Susanville, is the price of stuff. It's higher here than in any other state except Alaska then it's a toss up. Once-up-on-a-time this was a logging community. Now it's just another prison com- munity and everything is geared for it. As for prisons, from stories I've heard, a major women's prison, is slated for here, a CYA at Wendel, then the Fed- eral at Herlong. Yep, folks it's time to retire south of the boarder or just north to Alaska but it's so much fun living at the end of the line. John Stewart Susanville NICE WEBSITE! As a former resident of the beautiful county of Lassen Calif., I was very pleased to see this website, as I am miss- ing Susanville area very much. I graduated in the Class of 1995 from Lassen College and my time there was so wonder- ful that now I have finished my studies I will be using your website to find a home for me and my children, and to begin my career in teach- ing. Thank you for being there. Diane Navas former resident Advisory Board [HUSA] _ proceed along the. ,_Pa:fua 1 challenges when tale Jlu Report is submitted for approval as if the advisory board was any other city department submitting their operating budget to the City Council. I hope I have met the challenge of being constructive rather than being destructive. I I Buffalo Chips Downtown W 1 Hi00tod 256 24 2 it I iiiiiiii1|1111 ID IA IY I$ II f Aanestad introduces Sam Valley) COntrol support, i sides !signed on to the rural to This for approach in SEEKING A TENANT C- Stand Alone Building + .OOO sq. ft. is protection measure ;eXtensively its SAMAM00ESTAD STATE ASSEMBLYMAN especially with respect to eliminating the potential of catastrophic fires ...... A prescribed fire is the selected burning of over- accumulated vegetation and underbrush to eliminate the risk of larger and more intense catastrophic fires. However, within the last year, the Forest Service has had several prescribed Rres escape and become out of control. Consequently, a more effective approach is needed. In 1999, the Lowden Prescribed Fire destroyed 23 homes in Lewiston, Calif. This May, the Cerro Grande Prescribed Fire in Los Alamos, N.M., escaped control and eventually consumed 48,000 acres and destroyed 400 homes. Other escaped prescribed fires occurred in Mendocino National Forest and the Grand Canyon. Fire is an element that cannot be 100 percent controlled, which undoubtedly presents a certain level of danger. A comprehensive .maintenance program that mcorporates all aspects of wildfn-e Prevention must be developed. The UnJted States General Accounting Office issued a report in April 1999, on the efforts of the Forest Service. The GAO recommended a more cohesive strategy was needed to address the growing threats of catastrophic wildfires within national forests. The report stated that "...controlled fu'es can be used to reduce fuels, but (1) such fires may get out of control, and (2) the smoke they produce can cause significant air pollution. As a result, mechanical methods, including COmmercial timber harvesting, will often be necessary to remove accumulated fuels." Further more, "because of climactic COnditions and the density of tree stands, the danger of fire's escaping from such controlled burning is often too high in many areaS.oo  If there are other safer and effective options in controlling catastrophic fires, while simultaneously preserving the very nature of our forests, then those options should be u "Ulized. headng on farm and forost to be held in Davis July 21 deputy Depart- in rest and Under- and Au- the US- in- its and eco- nomic, environmental and ns cial benefits of farms an forests; challenges faced bY communities trying to prote. these areas; market oppO _rt" ties (e.g. direct marketing:..f_ tourism etc.) in maintaim. such areas, and how federal programs might best play a rom. tmments will be ttl. sized into a farmland pro- tion report to be issued bY u- DA later this year.. ..... The forum will be held at u University of CaUforniaAI)ner ' Alumni and Visitors t,,y  Room AGR, on Old Davis oau and Mark Hall Drive, from 9 a.m. - noon. Opening remarks by USDA officials will be fol- lowed by comments from Cali- fornia Central Valley panelists. Public comments will then be taken. Presenters are asked to limit their comments to three minutes and to pre regis- ter by contacting Mary Lou Flores at (202) 720-4525. Written comments can be submitted by sending 25 copies on or before July 18, 2000 to Stacie Kornegay, P.O. Box 2890, Washington DC 20013, room 6013. (Currently Ernest & Jessies- Coffee & Ceramics) Prime Location: Corner of Feather River Dr. & Main St. Suitable for: Retail, Professional Offices, Medical, Dental, Restaurant, etc. Available: September, 2000 3% to Cooperating Brokers Call Tim O'Brien (530) 258-2103 I I I PinePress MI0 P Tuesday, July 18, 2000 13C to the editor 11 Voters" they were 18 - 21 year s. The re- : o to say that the evenly split and how is that go- would happen could vote, That would be ex- really shake A new group of a thing. sad to think that ;chools can give same follow. get me wrong! haven't even it is wrong for them before a chance to re- things. They will generation, ff the that are currently all of them send them off to a nuclear ex- 1 SOme freaked out new genera- of nation- evange- belief systems. generation will into their own the vision of of this lnaybe, they will of Liberty, realize the re- }mess. because all me to pass. One , SOme future gen- have to come to that freedom and justice for all, means something other than what they are being offered. They will reject the system that does not deliver, and like the old pioneers, strike out on their own. Of course, they will have to contend with new dan- gers, but they will see a new world. If the Democrats and Repub- licans could deliver, they would have, and I would have not written this letter. But, we'll see what happens in November. James E. Ausmus Susanvllle BASIC CONFUCT WITH SKI RESORT Gosh, I guess some local lads do "make good", moving to the city and making big bucks at something other than being a professional athlete. I'm talk- ing of none other than real es- tate developer "tycoon" and "boy wonder" Briar Tazuk. Thus it was with great interest that my mother, who taught English many years ago at Chico Jr. High and remembers Briar as a good student there, and I read the article on the proposed ski resort near West- wood. Here is my reaction. It sounds like Briar and his associates are trying to be all things to all interested parties in the Westwood area. But I have to agree, however, with local activist Gary Pritchard. There seems to be a basic con- flict between trying to develop a fancy, almost citified "all- year" resort (something along the lines of Vail, Colo.?) and curtail HUSA 11 where the to compete to of Main the the impact When different changes You realize that stores has s. (1999:20 Vs 2000:28) and the Professional category has increased by two (1999:35 Vs 2000:37). These facts cannot be ignored. Financial Support From the city Firstl let's get the facts stated correctly. HUSA is getting financial support from the city. HUSA doesn't get an annual check but the financial support is providing police officers to/- C0nol tlie trafrld dtirg Safe and Sane Halloween and any other events that require being the caretakers of a wilderness area and its endan- gered species. Sure, local peo- ple want to make money, but be careful what you wish for as it might become reality. Just not in the way you hoped for. Briar envisions the West- wood area as being something like Truckee in the Tahoe re- gion. But I question whether the Almanor - Westwood area should be subject to the kind of scene that exists today an.y- where near Lake Tahoe. A lit- fie bit too much tourism, and a few too many tourists! (And the waters of Lake Tahoe are not as crystal clear as they once were). Do we really need that kind of "action" at the far northern end of the Sierra? And perhaps more jobs would be created but: 1) Wouldn't they be relatively low-paying jobs of question- able long-term benefit to those who held them? Plus, 2) A lot of people from outside the area would be competing for them along with the locals (such as the inhabitants of a number of the 1,000 homes that are pro- posed for construction). Thus I would caution West- wood area residents (as some- one who lives in a much larger wooded community that has al- ready been subject to rapid growth) to trust their future to those they have some sort of control over because as of this moment the lamb has never been able to lie down with the lion without being readily de- voured! If it happens in the case of Westwood, it would cer- tainly be a first. Good luck to the citizens and community of Westwood. I think they're going to need it. Jay Castor Paradise SOME BULL SOME NOT Well it is rodeo time again and this oldfnever waser" of- fers a few memories that may be amusing to modern bull riders. Let's take a look at how it was at Susanville in the first half of the 1930s. Instead of the hybrid born to buck bulls that we see in the arena today, it was pretty much Herefords that were commonly used. Spraker and Harwood fur- nished many of these and bucking was not a require- ment in their selection of her sires. What they had in mind was beef production, not un- ride-able rodeo athletes. In fact, the un-ride-able rogues we see today had not yet been "invented." Even with the stimulation of Mas- ten Ramsey's chemical con- coction called high life," which was poured liberally on their tail heads. They were not properly inspired to "turn the crank" as todays bulls do. Add to this the use of bull riggings, which were provided by the rodeo management at that time, and you had a real downer where showmanship was concerned. By way of ex- planation, believe it or not, a bull rigging was somewhat similar in appearance to the bareback rigging as used in the bareback riding event to- day, the main difference being that the bull rigging had two hand holds. Today's bull riders, with their bull ropes used with one hand, might be inclined to wonder if these old boys were serious. As I look back, the an- swer would have to be, "not very." During my high school years, I used to enter this event. Of course I never had reason to believe that they gave prizes. One big reason for this strange phenomenon being that two or more guys like Johnie Scheneider always showed up to skim the cream. Johnie could and did spur, these old things anywhere that he chose, looking back over a shoulder talking to the judges all the while you may very well ask, "why did some of us home guards even en- ter?" To which I can only re- spond, "Such is the optimism of youth." I cannot help but wonder what today's animal rights ac- tivists would have thought about Masten Ramsey's "high life." Guess that it's a little late to think about suing that great old boy. Seems like those were happier days, possibly, because most people were in- clined to mind there own busi- ness. Chub Coffin Janesville, Calif. END OF THE UNE So what do you think of that new intersection at south Fairfield and Riverside Drive? It's sure a beautiful piece of work, but it's an accident waiting to happen. The way it was set up was the best now there's a one way. From the east to west one must cross over to make a left turn - no stop sign 'til you get over the small incline. It's great for dry weather but when bad weather and icy conditions hit, folks will ei- ther get plowed into on River- side Drive or they'll skid across and go down the era- traffm control. The city prepares the quarterly assessment billing, collection of the assessments, and filing small claims action against HUSA delinquent members. I want to remind the readers of this article that the city funded the development of Pancera Plaza. This was only accomplished after the HUSA Board at the time presented a professional proposal to the city for approval. Exerce m.. by the City There is one area that the city has not exercised their authority granted by Streets and Highway Code. HUSA is an advisory beard appointed by the city and exists at the will of the city. Consequently, the city is ultimately responsible to the business Improvement District [BID] members for the administration and authorization of the levy of assessments and the expenditure of the revenue. To the BID members, the City Council represents the first line of defense. The BID members cannot and should not expect less. It is not incumbent on the BID members to raise an insurrection to challenge each Annual Report submitted by HUSA. It is the City Council's responsibility to have the bankment on the other side Then who will be sued, the company that installed it or the city? In most all other citys the traffic lights are in synchro they're set for a certain speed, normally 28 mph. but in our fair little city that's not so. They still need a light at Main and Lassen Street. What's nice about living in Susanville, is the price of stuff. It's higher here than in any other state except Alaska then it's a toss up. Once-up-on-a-time this was a logging community. Now it's just another prison com- munity and everything is geared for it. As for prisons, from stories I've heard, a major women's prison, is slated for here, a CYA at Wendel, then the Fed- eral at Herlong. Yep, folks it's time to retire south of the boarder or just north to Alaska but it's so much fun living at the end of the line. John Stewart Susanville NICE WEBSITE! As a former resident of the beautiful county of Lassen Calif., I was very pleased to see this website, as I am miss- ing Susanville area very much. I graduated in the Class of 1995 from Lassen College and my time there was so wonder- ful that now I have finished my studies I will be using your website to find a home for me and my children, and to begin my career in teach- ing. Thank you for being there. Diane Navas former resident Advisory Board [HUSA] _ proceed along the. ,_Pa:fua 1 challenges when tale Jlu Report is submitted for approval as if the advisory board was any other city department submitting their operating budget to the City Council. I hope I have met the challenge of being constructive rather than being destructive. I I Buffalo Chips Downtown W 1 Hi00tod 256 24 2 it I iiiiiiii1|1111 ID IA IY I$ II f Aanestad introduces Sam Valley) COntrol support, i sides !signed on to the rural to This for approach in SEEKING A TENANT C- Stand Alone Building + .OOO sq. ft. is protection measure ;eXtensively its SAMAM00ESTAD STATE ASSEMBLYMAN especially with respect to eliminating the potential of catastrophic fires ...... A prescribed fire is the selected burning of over- accumulated vegetation and underbrush to eliminate the risk of larger and more intense catastrophic fires. However, within the last year, the Forest Service has had several prescribed Rres escape and become out of control. Consequently, a more effective approach is needed. In 1999, the Lowden Prescribed Fire destroyed 23 homes in Lewiston, Calif. This May, the Cerro Grande Prescribed Fire in Los Alamos, N.M., escaped control and eventually consumed 48,000 acres and destroyed 400 homes. Other escaped prescribed fires occurred in Mendocino National Forest and the Grand Canyon. Fire is an element that cannot be 100 percent controlled, which undoubtedly presents a certain level of danger. A comprehensive .maintenance program that mcorporates all aspects of wildfn-e Prevention must be developed. The UnJted States General Accounting Office issued a report in April 1999, on the efforts of the Forest Service. The GAO recommended a more cohesive strategy was needed to address the growing threats of catastrophic wildfires within national forests. The report stated that "...controlled fu'es can be used to reduce fuels, but (1) such fires may get out of control, and (2) the smoke they produce can cause significant air pollution. As a result, mechanical methods, including COmmercial timber harvesting, will often be necessary to remove accumulated fuels." Further more, "because of climactic COnditions and the density of tree stands, the danger of fire's escaping from such controlled burning is often too high in many areaS.oo  If there are other safer and effective options in controlling catastrophic fires, while simultaneously preserving the very nature of our forests, then those options should be u "Ulized. headng on farm and forost to be held in Davis July 21 deputy Depart- in rest and Under- and Au- the US- in- its and eco- nomic, environmental and ns cial benefits of farms an forests; challenges faced bY communities trying to prote. these areas; market oppO _rt" ties (e.g. direct marketing:..f_ tourism etc.) in maintaim. such areas, and how federal programs might best play a rom. tmments will be ttl. sized into a farmland pro- tion report to be issued bY u- DA later this year.. ..... The forum will be held at u University of CaUforniaAI)ner ' Alumni and Visitors t,,y  Room AGR, on Old Davis oau and Mark Hall Drive, from 9 a.m. - noon. Opening remarks by USDA officials will be fol- lowed by comments from Cali- fornia Central Valley panelists. Public comments will then be taken. Presenters are asked to limit their comments to three minutes and to pre regis- ter by contacting Mary Lou Flores at (202) 720-4525. Written comments can be submitted by sending 25 copies on or before July 18, 2000 to Stacie Kornegay, P.O. Box 2890, Washington DC 20013, room 6013. (Currently Ernest & Jessies- Coffee & Ceramics) Prime Location: Corner of Feather River Dr. & Main St. Suitable for: Retail, Professional Offices, Medical, Dental, Restaurant, etc. Available: September, 2000 3% to Cooperating Brokers Call Tim O'Brien (530) 258-2103 I I I