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Lassen County Times
Susanville, California
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July 18, 2000     Lassen County Times
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July 18, 2000
 

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J., t uJdy, ,JU*y I o, vULAJ Lassen County Fair officials deliver a winner his week one of the county's proudest traditions, the Lassen County Fair, will be presenting "A Millennium of Memories." Although Fair activities began with last night's judging of still exhibits and today's livestock weigh- ins, the fair officially starts with a ribbon cutting ceremony tomorrow at 10 a.m. at the Smokey Bear Park Entrance Gate. To answer what [ :, i is probably fair goers most frequently asked question, the midway will be open from Wednesday through Sunday from 1 to 10 p.m. Special days on the calendar include Kiddies' Day, which will be celebrated all day Thursday, Old Times Day, featured on Friday and Ranchers' Day on Saturday. Sunday there will be free gate admissions all day. And don't forget the Fair Parade, which will proceed down Main Street at 10 a.m. Saturday. Other notable listings on the calander include the Miss Lassen County Fair Pageant, livestock judging of all kinds, music performed by local and internationally known stars, a professional bull riding competition as well as other events and activities too numerous to mention. Check the Fair Guide, which was delivered with last week's paper, for tlSe date and times of your favorite events and activities. That the size and scope of the fair has grown to rival that of any comparably sized county in the country is a tribute to Fair Manager Claud Neely and his staff as well as the Lassen County Fair Board. In addition to maintaining the facility, scheduling a wide variety of live enterttinment and organizing numerous competitions, the staff has been successful in soliciting sponsorships fromthe business community. Begun in 1878, the Fair was originally a combined effort with Plumas and Modoc counties. Lassen County went its own way in 1923, when a group of local ranchers and businessmen decided to split from the other two counties and put on their own production. Although the fair has seen its share of lean times, this year's effort should prove to be one of its best. The Lassen County Times salutes the extraodinary effort of all those involved in making the fair the success that it is. And if you've found that this year's fair is everything you hoped for, don't hesitate to drop by the fair office and let them know what you think. A kind word in the midst of their chaotic week will go a long way. A Feather :.00btiShing 0000i0000spaper / MielUel C. T, Publisher Peter Igoli=, General Manager Dave Mollw, Managing Editor $1UyI/tltmoce, City Editor Rob Broclmteye% Sports Editor Jane Feller, Social Editor Stal=f wdte Sam Williams, Debra Coates, Alicia Higbee, David H. Keller, Terri Nacar, Victoria Metcalf, Gail Brown, Shannon Morrow Joan VanDerBush, Woody Morgan, Jane Feller 800 Main St., Susanville, CA 96130 Declining prison numbers a wake-up or the first time in more than 20 years, there was a decline in California's prison popation during the past year. According to a story on the Chicago Tribune's Web page earlier this month, there were 360 fewer prisoners in June of this year than in June 1999. While a decline of 360 prisoners may not be in and of itself significant, it is at least a reversal of what has been a steady growth industry in California. According to the story, there was a 14.5 percent yearly increase in California's prison population between 1980 and 1989 and a 6.3 percent increase during the past 10 years. In hard numbers, the state's prison population as of late June stood at 161,401, down from 161,761 a year ago. The article concluded with a quote from Alfred Blummstein, a professor of public policy at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh: "California, as in so many things, is the leader in the nation, both in things good and bad. The drop in California is so small that it might just be noise, but it could also be an indication that finally we're seeing the first dove after the flood." According to the story the construction of a $335 million, 5,000-bed, high-security prison in Delano will not be affected by these new figures. C.A. Terhune, director of the Department of Corrections said, "We're still going to need prisons but at a much lower rate. We can go five years without having to go to the Legislature for additional construction." All of this is good news in general, but what it means for a community like Susanville may be another thing altogether. First of all there is the question of whether a drop of 360 people is significant in terms of the overall equation. Then there is the question of r whether a possible downward trend would have an effect on the numbers at our two local facilities, especially when the new prison goes on line in Delano. Finally there is the question of whether any possible decline in the number of prisoners would have an effect on the number of employees at High Desert and the California Correctional Center. Contingency planners would say the answers to those questions are not especially relevant. That there is a question in the first place is reason enough for a prison community like Susanville to plan for the possibility. What we're talking about here is a wakeup call. SusanviUe's business community got a shot in the arm with the construction of High Desert five years ago and has been experiencing good times ever since. But what if things changed with respect to our local prisons? Is there a plan in the works by elected officials and/or civic leaders in the city and county to stimulate economic diversity or are they content to let the economy be dependent on the whim of the California Department of Corrections? What might happen if a new prison goes on line in Delano and incarceration continue to decline? It is at least possible that some bean counter m could make a decision that affect the economies of any number! communities, including ours. In any case, it would be to the to begin developing and for economic diversification. What does that mean? It means look at the area's economic finding ways to encourage and that would help realize that could happen in several wa As the eastern gateway to Plumas national forests, Volcanic National Park, ventures that would appeal to A Susanville or Lassen park offering a break on the cost ofl and some local tax incentives start additional local light industrY. A major effort to market this features and benefits to the community could produce Have you ever asked yot sorts of ideas seem to work in some: communities and not anothers? differences seem to be the will community leaders and promote attract new : community. As a prison town whose concern to the rest of the state, much left to our own devices. choice of leaving hands of the De preparing for it ourselves. Which is it going to be? lqOOs Iq1000 IL00UK c::::::; IT-----L-T W ar00TV i%o00 DISCO FAIR 2.0 00qSOs WALL f 00mother smog;el' t-ying to kick the 've always heard 13 is an unlucky number, but it seems pretty lucky to me today. It's been 13 days since I smoked my last cigarette, and I'm still waiting to feel like my old self. It all started with the long holiday weekend for the Fourth of July. After we put the Times to bed on Thursday, June 29, and worked the better part of Friday, June 30, I took off for a family outing at a nearby lake who's name I A sullen, withdrawn, depressed Sam Williams keeps his own company in front of day w a m, eue. Nl00Turn S0000AM00AMS STAFF WRITER cannot mention. Friday night was great. The firewood was plentiful and everyone was jolly as the sky turned from turquoise to carbon paper pricked by stars. I smoked, and smoked, and smoked. But after midnight beneath a sky stained by the Milky Way the final hour had arrived. I emptied the ashtray from my van into the coals, fired up the last butt in my pack, and contemplated my rocky future. Luckily for some reason I didn't realize how hard I was taking it at the time. But when we got some photographs back from the processor, e evidence was stunning. J.z, after three days t was qme a mess -- SUllen, withdrawn, depressed. I'm glad I really don't remember being as ugly as I obviously was. All good things must end, and long holiday weekends are no exception. Wednesday, July 5, arrived and I dutifully returned to work. During several interviews on Day Five, I found myself apologizing to sources. I don't mind being aggressive sometimes (in fact aggressiveness is sometimes a virtue for reporters), but I felt like I was pushing a little too hard. Then one of my fellow reporters characterized me as "surly." I guess I could.have gone burned one, and returned to obnoxious self, but I this habit. Well, that was a week ago, and l survived the worst of it. A told me to focus on the negative feel if I had "a relapse," an happened to me yet. She told me attention to events which for a smoke. And she suggested I behaviors" when I feel th although I think it's kind of silly thinking about reading the bathtub! But I think the best advice to point out that the craving about 20 seconds. Now I don't hold my hand in tiling il for know I can resist  urge to longer than that. I tried to quit a few months agO, some good advice Attorney Robert Burn., first one that gets you." Now that I'm used to feeling change dections in my my smoker's cough has now that I'm past the strongest nicotine, now that I've games trying to figure smoke and quit at the same time, advice is the best. No matter how bad I still want be OK as long as I don't first cig. Now if Bob will just gettin so t:vset., Lassen County Fair officials deliver a winner his week one of the county's proudest traditions, the Lassen County Fair, will be presenting "A Millennium of Memories." Although Fair activities began with last night's judging of still exhibits and today's livestock weigh- ins, the fair officially starts with a ribbon cutting ceremony tomorrow at 10 a.m. at the Smokey Bear Park Entrance Gate. To answer what [ :, i is probably fair goers most frequently asked question, the midway will be open from Wednesday through Sunday from 1 to 10 p.m. Special days on the calendar include Kiddies' Day, which will be celebrated all day Thursday, Old Times Day, featured on Friday and Ranchers' Day on Saturday. Sunday there will be free gate admissions all day. And don't forget the Fair Parade, which will proceed down Main Street at 10 a.m. Saturday. Other notable listings on the calander include the Miss Lassen County Fair Pageant, livestock judging of all kinds, music performed by local and internationally known stars, a professional bull riding competition as well as other events and activities too numerous to mention. Check the Fair Guide, which was delivered with last week's paper, for tlSe date and times of your favorite events and activities. That the size and scope of the fair has grown to rival that of any comparably sized county in the country is a tribute to Fair Manager Claud Neely and his staff as well as the Lassen County Fair Board. In addition to maintaining the facility, scheduling a wide variety of live enterttinment and organizing numerous competitions, the staff has been successful in soliciting sponsorships fromthe business community. Begun in 1878, the Fair was originally a combined effort with Plumas and Modoc counties. Lassen County went its own way in 1923, when a group of local ranchers and businessmen decided to split from the other two counties and put on their own production. Although the fair has seen its share of lean times, this year's effort should prove to be one of its best. The Lassen County Times salutes the extraodinary effort of all those involved in making the fair the success that it is. And if you've found that this year's fair is everything you hoped for, don't hesitate to drop by the fair office and let them know what you think. A kind word in the midst of their chaotic week will go a long way. A Feather :.00btiShing 0000i0000spaper / MielUel C. T, Publisher Peter Igoli=, General Manager Dave Mollw, Managing Editor $1UyI/tltmoce, City Editor Rob Broclmteye% Sports Editor Jane Feller, Social Editor Stal=f wdte Sam Williams, Debra Coates, Alicia Higbee, David H. Keller, Terri Nacar, Victoria Metcalf, Gail Brown, Shannon Morrow Joan VanDerBush, Woody Morgan, Jane Feller 800 Main St., Susanville, CA 96130 Declining prison numbers a wake-up or the first time in more than 20 years, there was a decline in California's prison popation during the past year. According to a story on the Chicago Tribune's Web page earlier this month, there were 360 fewer prisoners in June of this year than in June 1999. While a decline of 360 prisoners may not be in and of itself significant, it is at least a reversal of what has been a steady growth industry in California. According to the story, there was a 14.5 percent yearly increase in California's prison population between 1980 and 1989 and a 6.3 percent increase during the past 10 years. In hard numbers, the state's prison population as of late June stood at 161,401, down from 161,761 a year ago. The article concluded with a quote from Alfred Blummstein, a professor of public policy at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh: "California, as in so many things, is the leader in the nation, both in things good and bad. The drop in California is so small that it might just be noise, but it could also be an indication that finally we're seeing the first dove after the flood." According to the story the construction of a $335 million, 5,000-bed, high-security prison in Delano will not be affected by these new figures. C.A. Terhune, director of the Department of Corrections said, "We're still going to need prisons but at a much lower rate. We can go five years without having to go to the Legislature for additional construction." All of this is good news in general, but what it means for a community like Susanville may be another thing altogether. First of all there is the question of whether a drop of 360 people is significant in terms of the overall equation. Then there is the question of r whether a possible downward trend would have an effect on the numbers at our two local facilities, especially when the new prison goes on line in Delano. Finally there is the question of whether any possible decline in the number of prisoners would have an effect on the number of employees at High Desert and the California Correctional Center. Contingency planners would say the answers to those questions are not especially relevant. That there is a question in the first place is reason enough for a prison community like Susanville to plan for the possibility. What we're talking about here is a wakeup call. SusanviUe's business community got a shot in the arm with the construction of High Desert five years ago and has been experiencing good times ever since. But what if things changed with respect to our local prisons? Is there a plan in the works by elected officials and/or civic leaders in the city and county to stimulate economic diversity or are they content to let the economy be dependent on the whim of the California Department of Corrections? What might happen if a new prison goes on line in Delano and incarceration continue to decline? It is at least possible that some bean counter m could make a decision that affect the economies of any number! communities, including ours. In any case, it would be to the to begin developing and for economic diversification. What does that mean? It means look at the area's economic finding ways to encourage and that would help realize that could happen in several wa As the eastern gateway to Plumas national forests, Volcanic National Park, ventures that would appeal to A Susanville or Lassen park offering a break on the cost ofl and some local tax incentives start additional local light industrY. A major effort to market this features and benefits to the community could produce Have you ever asked yot sorts of ideas seem to work in some: communities and not anothers? differences seem to be the will community leaders and promote attract new : community. As a prison town whose concern to the rest of the state, much left to our own devices. choice of leaving hands of the De preparing for it ourselves. Which is it going to be? lqOOs Iq1000 ILBUK c::::::; IT-----L-T W ar00TV i%o00 DISCO FAIR 2.0 00qSOs WALL f 00mother smog;el' t-ying to kick the 've always heard 13 is an unlucky number, but it seems pretty lucky to me today. It's been 13 days since I smoked my last cigarette, and I'm still waiting to feel like my old self. It all started with the long holiday weekend for the Fourth of July. After we put the Times to bed on Thursday, June 29, and worked the better part of Friday, June 30, I took off for a family outing at a nearby lake who's name I A sullen, withdrawn, depressed Sam Williams keeps his own company in front of day w a m, eue. Nl00Turn S0000AM00AMS STAFF WRITER cannot mention. Friday night was great. The firewood was plentiful and everyone was jolly as the sky turned from turquoise to carbon paper pricked by stars. I smoked, and smoked, and smoked. But after midnight beneath a sky stained by the Milky Way the final hour had arrived. I emptied the ashtray from my van into the coals, fired up the last butt in my pack, and contemplated my rocky future. Luckily for some reason I didn't realize how hard I was taking it at the time. But when we got some photographs back from the processor, e evidence was stunning. J.z, after three days t was qme a mess -- SUllen, withdrawn, depressed. I'm glad I really don't remember being as ugly as I obviously was. All good things must end, and long holiday weekends are no exception. Wednesday, July 5, arrived and I dutifully returned to work. During several interviews on Day Five, I found myself apologizing to sources. I don't mind being aggressive sometimes (in fact aggressiveness is sometimes a virtue for reporters), but I felt like I was pushing a little too hard. Then one of my fellow reporters characterized me as "surly." I guess I could.have gone burned one, and returned to obnoxious self, but I this habit. Well, that was a week ago, and l survived the worst of it. A told me to focus on the negative feel if I had "a relapse," an happened to me yet. She told me attention to events which for a smoke. And she suggested I behaviors" when I feel th although I think it's kind of silly thinking about reading the bathtub! But I think the best advice to point out that the craving about 20 seconds. Now I don't hold my hand in tiling il for know I can resist  urge to longer than that. I tried to quit a few months agO, some good advice Attorney Robert Burn., first one that gets you." Now that I'm used to feeling change dections in my my smoker's cough has now that I'm past the strongest nicotine, now that I've games trying to figure smoke and quit at the same time, advice is the best. No matter how bad I still want be OK as long as I don't first cig. Now if Bob will just gettin so t:vset.,