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Lassen County Times
Susanville, California
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July 18, 2000     Lassen County Times
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July 18, 2000
 

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bU I uesday, July 18, 2000 Limits aplenty at Eagle Plenty of limits are be- ing reported at Eagle Lake. Anglers are mainly testing their luck around Eagle's Nest with action picking up near Shrimp Island. Trollers are working 35 feet down in 60 feet of wa- ter with Needlefish; black, pearl and rainbow bikinis, and Red Dot frogs. Catches are averaging two to three pounds with a handful of four pounders. Call 825-2191 for the lat- est. Use the basics here in the early morning and at dusk. Night crawlers for trout in the mid to deeper depths and worms for bass along the shoreline. Some monstrous catfish have been caught near the boat ramp. Aside from Brandon Gress' 35-pounder (see above photo), Bob Frank- ford of Reno latched on to a 25-pounder that took him nearly a hour to reel in. Frankford used a sar- dine. F River River flowing at 8,000 cubic feet per second near Oroville. Anglers picking upKing salmon from 10 to 20 pounds with some days better than others. Try Flatfish with sar- dine wrap and bouncing roe. The hot bite has not ar- rived yet. Anglers are get- ting a fish per rod. Call 800-6704448 for the latest. Mv From Redding to An- derson, the river is mov- ing at 15,000 cfs with no levels is not easy, but the afternoon bite is great, producing rainbows on spin and fly gear. Glo- bugs and Flatfish are also prodpctive. Salon are starting to roll along the river's edge. Remember, the King salmon opener is Satur- day, July 16. Call 800670-4448 for the latest. Fishing is still slow as anglers are awaiting the water level to drop once the dam is open for a while. Night crawlers are re- portedly the best bet and some are using a variety of marshmallows and a bobber. The best fishing is ex- pected to start in early August. I:m,.ml Lake Shore fishermen are reeling in nice catches, averaging up to three pounds. Most are using night crawlers. Trollers should try ba- by night crawlers behind flashers. The fish are deep. Fly fishermen are find- ing luck with caddis flies in Little Last Chance Creek. Campgrounds are fill- ing up fast on the week- ends. Call 1-877-444-6777 in the midweek to get a spot. Call 9934683 for the lat- est fishing methods. FREE ' Floghts! Take a high-flying adven- ture, and learn about aviation at the same time. Local pilots and members of Susanville's EAA Chapter 794 continue to offer free airplane rides for eight to seventeen-year o!ds. Qualified pilots and irciaft are available on short notice. For reserva- tions or information, call 253-3987 I I ..... .. High school rodeos come back to By  Metc Staff Wdter They're coming back. When Plumas-Sierra County Fairgrounds Manager Mike Clements finished his presen- tation to the California High School Rodeo Association (CHSRA) Thursday, June 22, he received applause. He also won back the competition that left Plumas County a decade ago. "Basically, we're giving them the facility for nothing," Clements said. And from the outset of the trip to Red Bluff June 21, he is keeping a run- ning tab. At the end of the two- year contract he will know ex- actly what it cbsts to run the event. Clements is offering CHSRA a partnership with the fair- grounds. That includes the use of the grounds free for the two- year contract, support from businesses, organizations and the Board of Supervisors, as well as an accessible staff at the fairgrounds. The event will be returning to the fairgrounds for eight days in mid-June for 2001 and 2002. On June 20 the Board of Su- pervisors fronted the neces- saw cash for the event. During a fair board meeting Wednesday, June 28, chair- man of the Board of Supervi- sors Don Clark said there wasn't time to raise funding through other channels. Most of the supervisors wanted to show their support in promot- ing an event they believe will benefit Plumas County, and ap- proved funding should Clements require it in negotia- tions. Clements said he is con- vinced a concerted fund-rais- ing effort will raise $35,000 to $40,000 for the first year of the CHSRA. Although he would like to see the funding fronted by the Board of Supervisors used as working cash, project- ed funds raised will run the event and help fund needed im- provements on the fair- gounds. Without accurate figures to predict the first year's expens- es, Clements sad he antici- pates it will co20,000 to $25,000 to operate the'Lent. He also needs additional funding to enable him to complete capi- tal improvements to the bleachers and concessions in the grandstands. Clements has his paperwork into the state's Fairs and Expo- sitions, which has been gener- ous to the Plumas-Sierra Coun- ty Fairgrounds in the past four and a half years. But he's learned the state is more gen- erous when local efforts put up a portion of the money and show an interest in the fair- grounds. Assisted by the Quincy Chamber of Commerce; Plumas Corporation; Bob Phelps, a Quincy businessman; and others; Clements said fund-raising efforts will in- clude Plumas County sources, but also "out of the box" fi- nancing. By out of the box, Clements means those companies and corporations who sell products in Plumas County but don't live here. CHSRA is not al. lowed to advertise for alcohol or tobacco companies, but there are plenty of other com- panies to approach, he said. Clements said Phelps be- lieves he can raise about $10,0(D--in increments of $500 to $5,000--from the Graeagle area. These investors would like to see families return to vacation and to purchase prop- erty. "To make money you have to be willing to spend some mon- ey," Clements said. In relieving some concerns expressed by local business owners, Clements explained that in offering the fair- grounds, he told the associa- tion that, "With this offer we would like to request that you use the money saved to pur- chase belt buckles in lieu of so- liciting sponsors in the com- munity." This is an attempt to convey a message to residents and business people that they won't be hit up by CHSRA to continue to contribute to the rodeo. Support "Other people have already donated, and all it took was a phone call," Clements said about local support. Plumas Bank and Les Schwab have each agreed to purchase a horse trailer for the all-round winners. The trailers cost $3,100 each. Plumas Coun- ty Alcohol and Drug Depart- ment and the Plumas County Tobacco Use Reduction Pro- gram have committed to a min- imum of $1,000 to provide young adult programs in the evenings during the event. The Plumas County Sheriff's Department will provide secu- rity at the event at no charge to CHSRA. The Plumas County Data Processing Department has offered a computer, printer and copy machine for CHSRA use, and Plumas District Hos- pital has donated 50 hours of ambulance service. To meet other requirements, a local business is willing to supply vending machines to the fairgrounds for the event, and John Deere is donating two Gators for CHSRA to use during the competitions. A water truck will be sup- plied, and motels in Quincy are providing six to 10 rooms for the executive staff, accord- ing to Clements, and the com- mitments continue to grow. In rounding up support from various factions in Plumas County, Clements threw out a $275,000 figure. He said the county stands to gain that much money from hosting the event. Explaining the figure, Clements said Plumas Corpo- ration has a $65 figure it at- taches to the amount anticipat- ed in revenues generated by groups visiting the area. That amount includes lodging, food, fuel and incidentals. Red Bluff figured that $55 was spent per person during the rodeo, Clements said. These are athletes, is the message fair board President Leonard Ross wants residents to understand about CHSRA. On June 28 he said that if this was the state finals in basket- ball or football, people would be more than willing to con- tribute to having the event held locally. The CHSRA finals is in the same league, according to Ross. The difference in rodeo competition and other state athletic finals is that CHSRA is serf-supporting and depends on sponsors for its funding. Leaving nothing to chance, Clements was accompanied by Supervisor Phil Bresciani and Oran Morrison, head of fair- grounds maintenance. They arrived June 21 to scout out the competition and prepare for the presentation. Clements said the associa- tion seemed impressed that a supervisor was willing to spend the time to attend the meeting. "I'd like to give Phil a lot of credit on this," Clements said. "They were impressed." Competing against Siskiyou County and Red Bluff, Clements said all presenta- tions were given tion separately. And, as Clements demonstrated it where Plumas 1991 and lost the said the Red sically pointed to and said that was to offer. The the event was According to CHSRA wanted ready for a change. With the Brakken from County Clements went slide fairgrounds, surrounding of that pressing upon that temI County are milder mer than what spectators have Red Bluff. To need for a ence already edge that died during this tition. The heat ered a factor in t death, C The audience ed the close neer Pool and of outdoor tunities in the Clements said responded to his concept. They are promoting the schools and giving tional passes. "This has personal goals four and a Clements said. that long and worth of im the contract. ii!::/i , iiiii!ii BIG --- RENO SHOW Reno Hilton Aug. 11,12,13 Sun 9.3 mic $7 15 Under FREE 77S82800350 Marlboro, W'mston & Camel KEIrSTON00 CRYSTAL VODKA 19 -- *1800 S " 257-4465 822 Main St. usanville If TIs weok 'ra  lama 2 DHT. V-8, m,o.. 2D-fr, v-e, mso., '5"/ V-8, j.. A/C 56,000 miles auto., NC, p,S I, ..--_ GA/E Wa0o, V-6, auto. mmL morn. #21197. 00cu NC. aura., CO. #548... Ato.. ArC, PS, pw. Pot., #55345 . |IIIW bU I uesday, July 18, 2000 Limits aplenty at Eagle Plenty of limits are be- ing reported at Eagle Lake. Anglers are mainly testing their luck around Eagle's Nest with action picking up near Shrimp Island. Trollers are working 35 feet down in 60 feet of wa- ter with Needlefish; black, pearl and rainbow bikinis, and Red Dot frogs. Catches are averaging two to three pounds with a handful of four pounders. Call 825-2191 for the lat- est. Use the basics here in the early morning and at dusk. Night crawlers for trout in the mid to deeper depths and worms for bass along the shoreline. Some monstrous catfish have been caught near the boat ramp. Aside from Brandon Gress' 35-pounder (see above photo), Bob Frank- ford of Reno latched on to a 25-pounder that took him nearly a hour to reel in. Frankford used a sar- dine. F River River flowing at 8,000 cubic feet per second near Oroville. Anglers picking upKing salmon from 10 to 20 pounds with some days better than others. Try Flatfish with sar- dine wrap and bouncing roe. The hot bite has not ar- rived yet. Anglers are get- ting a fish per rod. Call 800-6704448 for the latest. Mv From Redding to An- derson, the river is mov- ing at 15,000 cfs with no levels is not easy, but the afternoon bite is great, producing rainbows on spin and fly gear. Glo- bugs and Flatfish are also prodpctive. Salon are starting to roll along the river's edge. Remember, the King salmon opener is Satur- day, July 16. Call 800670-4448 for the latest. Fishing is still slow as anglers are awaiting the water level to drop once the dam is open for a while. Night crawlers are re- portedly the best bet and some are using a variety of marshmallows and a bobber. The best fishing is ex- pected to start in early August. I:m,.ml Lake Shore fishermen are reeling in nice catches, averaging up to three pounds. Most are using night crawlers. Trollers should try ba- by night crawlers behind flashers. The fish are deep. Fly fishermen are find- ing luck with caddis flies in Little Last Chance Creek. Campgrounds are fill- ing up fast on the week- ends. Call 1-877-444-6777 in the midweek to get a spot. Call 9934683 for the lat- est fishing methods. FREE ' Floghts! Take a high-flying adven- ture, and learn about aviation at the same time. Local pilots and members of Susanville's EAA Chapter 794 continue to offer free airplane rides for eight to seventeen-year o!ds. Qualified pilots and irciaft are available on short notice. For reserva- tions or information, call 253-3987 I I ..... .. High school rodeos come back to By  Metc Staff Wdter They're coming back. When Plumas-Sierra County Fairgrounds Manager Mike Clements finished his presen- tation to the California High School Rodeo Association (CHSRA) Thursday, June 22, he received applause. He also won back the competition that left Plumas County a decade ago. "Basically, we're giving them the facility for nothing," Clements said. And from the outset of the trip to Red Bluff June 21, he is keeping a run- ning tab. At the end of the two- year contract he will know ex- actly what it cbsts to run the event. Clements is offering CHSRA a partnership with the fair- grounds. That includes the use of the grounds free for the two- year contract, support from businesses, organizations and the Board of Supervisors, as well as an accessible staff at the fairgrounds. The event will be returning to the fairgrounds for eight days in mid-June for 2001 and 2002. On June 20 the Board of Su- pervisors fronted the neces- saw cash for the event. During a fair board meeting Wednesday, June 28, chair- man of the Board of Supervi- sors Don Clark said there wasn't time to raise funding through other channels. Most of the supervisors wanted to show their support in promot- ing an event they believe will benefit Plumas County, and ap- proved funding should Clements require it in negotia- tions. Clements said he is con- vinced a concerted fund-rais- ing effort will raise $35,000 to $40,000 for the first year of the CHSRA. Although he would like to see the funding fronted by the Board of Supervisors used as working cash, project- ed funds raised will run the event and help fund needed im- provements on the fair- gounds. Without accurate figures to predict the first year's expens- es, Clements sad he antici- pates it will co20,000 to $25,000 to operate the'Lent. He also needs additional funding to enable him to complete capi- tal improvements to the bleachers and concessions in the grandstands. Clements has his paperwork into the state's Fairs and Expo- sitions, which has been gener- ous to the Plumas-Sierra Coun- ty Fairgrounds in the past four and a half years. But he's learned the state is more gen- erous when local efforts put up a portion of the money and show an interest in the fair- grounds. Assisted by the Quincy Chamber of Commerce; Plumas Corporation; Bob Phelps, a Quincy businessman; and others; Clements said fund-raising efforts will in- clude Plumas County sources, but also "out of the box" fi- nancing. By out of the box, Clements means those companies and corporations who sell products in Plumas County but don't live here. CHSRA is not al. lowed to advertise for alcohol or tobacco companies, but there are plenty of other com- panies to approach, he said. Clements said Phelps be- lieves he can raise about $10,0(D--in increments of $500 to $5,000--from the Graeagle area. These investors would like to see families return to vacation and to purchase prop- erty. "To make money you have to be willing to spend some mon- ey," Clements said. In relieving some concerns expressed by local business owners, Clements explained that in offering the fair- grounds, he told the associa- tion that, "With this offer we would like to request that you use the money saved to pur- chase belt buckles in lieu of so- liciting sponsors in the com- munity." This is an attempt to convey a message to residents and business people that they won't be hit up by CHSRA to continue to contribute to the rodeo. Support "Other people have already donated, and all it took was a phone call," Clements said about local support. Plumas Bank and Les Schwab have each agreed to purchase a horse trailer for the all-round winners. The trailers cost $3,100 each. Plumas Coun- ty Alcohol and Drug Depart- ment and the Plumas County Tobacco Use Reduction Pro- gram have committed to a min- imum of $1,000 to provide young adult programs in the evenings during the event. The Plumas County Sheriff's Department will provide secu- rity at the event at no charge to CHSRA. The Plumas County Data Processing Department has offered a computer, printer and copy machine for CHSRA use, and Plumas District Hos- pital has donated 50 hours of ambulance service. To meet other requirements, a local business is willing to supply vending machines to the fairgrounds for the event, and John Deere is donating two Gators for CHSRA to use during the competitions. A water truck will be sup- plied, and motels in Quincy are providing six to 10 rooms for the executive staff, accord- ing to Clements, and the com- mitments continue to grow. In rounding up support from various factions in Plumas County, Clements threw out a $275,000 figure. He said the county stands to gain that much money from hosting the event. Explaining the figure, Clements said Plumas Corpo- ration has a $65 figure it at- taches to the amount anticipat- ed in revenues generated by groups visiting the area. That amount includes lodging, food, fuel and incidentals. Red Bluff figured that $55 was spent per person during the rodeo, Clements said. These are athletes, is the message fair board President Leonard Ross wants residents to understand about CHSRA. On June 28 he said that if this was the state finals in basket- ball or football, people would be more than willing to con- tribute to having the event held locally. The CHSRA finals is in the same league, according to Ross. The difference in rodeo competition and other state athletic finals is that CHSRA is serf-supporting and depends on sponsors for its funding. Leaving nothing to chance, Clements was accompanied by Supervisor Phil Bresciani and Oran Morrison, head of fair- grounds maintenance. They arrived June 21 to scout out the competition and prepare for the presentation. Clements said the associa- tion seemed impressed that a supervisor was willing to spend the time to attend the meeting. "I'd like to give Phil a lot of credit on this," Clements said. "They were impressed." Competing against Siskiyou County and Red Bluff, Clements said all presenta- tions were given tion separately. And, as Clements demonstrated it where Plumas 1991 and lost the said the Red sically pointed to and said that was to offer. The the event was According to CHSRA wanted ready for a change. With the Brakken from County Clements went slide fairgrounds, surrounding of that pressing upon that temI County are milder mer than what spectators have Red Bluff. To need for a ence already edge that died during this tition. The heat ered a factor in t death, C The audience ed the close neer Pool and of outdoor tunities in the Clements said responded to his concept. They are promoting the schools and giving tional passes. "This has personal goals four and a Clements said. that long and worth of im the contract. ii!::/i , iiiii!ii BIG --- RENO SHOW Reno Hilton Aug. 11,12,13 Sun 9.3 mic $7 15 Under FREE 77S82800350 Marlboro, W'mston & Camel KEIrSTON00 CRYSTAL VODKA 19 -- *1800 S " 257-4465 822 Main St. usanville If TIs weok 'ra  lama 2 DHT. V-8, m,o.. 2D-fr, v-e, mso., '5"/ V-8, j.. A/C 56,000 miles auto., NC, p,S I, ..--_ GA/E Wa0o, V-6, auto. mmL morn. #21197. 00cu NC. aura., CO. #548... Ato.. ArC, PS, pw. Pot., #55345 . |IIIW