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July 18, 2000     Lassen County Times
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6A Tuesday, July 18, 2000 Supervisors say no thanks to Big Valley Ry Woody Morgan Staff Writer What's the use. That seemed to be the general opinion of the Lassen County Board of Super- visors when Big Valley Dis- trict Ranger Sue Wheatley asked the board to participate in an analysis of the Modoc National Forest, Tuesday July 11. Wheatley was on hand for a presentation of information sharing on the Modoc Nation- al Forest who is beginning to develop a new landscape/wa- tershed analysis of 246, 000 acres on the Big Valley Ranger district, part of which is in Lassen County. Wheatley told the board the acreage was critical to the Modoc National Forest and the communities that depend on it. The watershed analysis would include a look at fuels hazard reduction, recreation, roads, livestock allotments and timber diversity. "The forest service hopes to develop sufficient data to have project proposals for environ- mental analysis by the sum- met of 2001 with a decision is- sued in the summer of 2002, " Wheatley said. The timeline drew immedi- ate fire from several board members. The major concern was over the sustained yield units which District Four Supervi- sor Brian Dahle pointed out, one of three in the nation was in his district near Bieber. 'I have one mill in my dis- trict who is importing logs from Washingtoh," Dahle said, "because we can't get product out of our state yield unit. "I manage a ranch of 22,000 acres and right next to me is the forest service and it's so thick (the trees) that you can't even drive a cow through it. Something tells me we are /i nrhere is II absolutely no intent, at the regional or national level to ac)mmodate the proposals and hopes and aspirations that you represent at the podium today." Jim Chapman Supervisor having a serious problem with getting on the ground and get- ting something done." "There is a serious problem with logging small trees," Wheatley said. "There are high handling costs, basically anything below eight inches is not merchantable. The bio- mass market is terrible right now." But Dahle pointed out some- thing must be done before catastrophic wildfires burn it all down. Dahle asked Wheatley what the board could do this time af- ter so many hours had already gone to waste. "Until we get a different ad- ministration at the higher lev- el," Dahle said, "that is going to say heh, we're going to get out here and do something, we are just wasting a lot of time and effort." District Three Supervisor and Board President Lloyd Keefer echoed Dahle's concern over the lack of logging the sustained yield unit. "It impacts the whole social weU-being of the economy, the local economy," Keefer said. "I hope you can appreciate the frustration that we are going through.." District Two Supervisor Jim Chapman concluded the ef- forts of the local forest officials and other lobbying efforts were not being taken serious- ly. "There is absolutely no in- tent, at the regional or nation- al level," Chapman said, "to accommodate the proposals and hopes and aspirations that you represent at the podium today." Chapman pointed out the re- al issue is the power of the Sierra Club, which has lobbied against any cutting of trees on national forest land. "We've got congressional ac- tion behind us, the appropria- tions," Chapman said, "so we don't have any excuses that we don't have the staffing to get it on the ground. "Which tells me that the Sierra Club has more power in this country than Congress, the district rangers, the boards of supervisors and the people that live in these various com- munities." While the board refused to actively participate in the analysis study, they did ask that the forest service to re- port back every three to six months. $ $1.00 OF Pint for pint blood drive at Moran Hall July 25.26 There will be a Susanville Community Pint for Pint blood drive, Tuesday, July 25, from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. and Wednesday, July 26, from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. at the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Msg. Moran Hall, 140 North Weather- low. Contact Dick Havey at 257-5511 to make your appointment. The drive is sponsored by the Sacred Heart Knights of Columbus and Morning Glory Dairy. With the current trend of fewer and fewer people donating during the summer, United Blood Services is trying to avoid an emergen- cy blood alert. Supply levels are dangerously low and may result in the postponement of non-life threatening surgeries and other med- ical procedures dependent on blood and blood products. We currently are extremely low on all blood types, especially O-positive and blood types. Everyone who is 17] older, weighing at least 110 lbs. make a difference in their The donation process takes an hour. Bring As a non-profit or Services is consistently fective. By scheduling an are helping to ensure that equate number of staff and ment needed to accommodate ty's blood drive. If you have questions rel ty to donate due to medication, (malaria risk areas) or a you can call United Blood 1-8(D-696-4484. All Lassen County food schedule for August com The TEFAP and Brown Bag Food Distribution Schedule for August is as follows: Herlong, TEFAP and Brown Bag: Distribution will be made at 10 a.m. Friday, Aug. 11, at Herlong Communi- ty Center. Eagle Lake, TEFAP and Brown Bag: Distribution will be made Thursday, Aug. I0, at Eagle Lake Community Cen- ter. Westwood, TEFAP Only: Distribution will be made at 1 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 10, at Westwood Senior Center. Termo, TEFAP and Brown Bag: Dis decided. All other County will September: Big Valley, Doyle, Janesville, Susanville. Watch tion schedule. Celebrating 6 years as your local place to for quality brands, price, ;erviq e and 10% OFF Sheriffs De Brown Jum CLEARANCE 00_EDICAL SCRUBS UPTOWN UNIFORMS 718 MAIN ST. * SUSANVILLE * 251-5855 STORE HOURS: NI 9 AM - 5 PM * SAT 10-3 PM ........ OPEN A CREDIT ACCOUNT TODAY \\; COUNTY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION GRAND OPENING CERTIFICATE Available for a limited time only! APY ANNUAL PERCENTAGE YIELD (APY) is effective as of July 12, 2000 and assumes the funds will remain on deposit for 18 months. A $10,000 Minimum opening balance is required. There is a substantial penalty for early withdrawal. Offer good for a limited time. Rates subject to change without notice. Technology is evolving at a rapid pace. Adelphia has a commitment to remain on the ting edge. With this perspective in mind, we have joined forces with technology in of healthcare to help fund cancer research. This month, each time you order Adelphia Cable TV, we21 give the $5 it costs for tion to help fight this killing disease. Your $5 combined with your neighbor's $5 and so and so on...together we can make a difference. For more inlormMion rail 8004264299 Our mission has always been to offer you new technologies combined with superior customer service. 6A Tuesday, July 18, 2000 Supervisors say no thanks to Big Valley Ry Woody Morgan Staff Writer What's the use. That seemed to be the general opinion of the Lassen County Board of Super- visors when Big Valley Dis- trict Ranger Sue Wheatley asked the board to participate in an analysis of the Modoc National Forest, Tuesday July 11. Wheatley was on hand for a presentation of information sharing on the Modoc Nation- al Forest who is beginning to develop a new landscape/wa- tershed analysis of 246, 000 acres on the Big Valley Ranger district, part of which is in Lassen County. Wheatley told the board the acreage was critical to the Modoc National Forest and the communities that depend on it. The watershed analysis would include a look at fuels hazard reduction, recreation, roads, livestock allotments and timber diversity. "The forest service hopes to develop sufficient data to have project proposals for environ- mental analysis by the sum- met of 2001 with a decision is- sued in the summer of 2002, " Wheatley said. The timeline drew immedi- ate fire from several board members. The major concern was over the sustained yield units which District Four Supervi- sor Brian Dahle pointed out, one of three in the nation was in his district near Bieber. 'I have one mill in my dis- trict who is importing logs from Washingtoh," Dahle said, "because we can't get product out of our state yield unit. "I manage a ranch of 22,000 acres and right next to me is the forest service and it's so thick (the trees) that you can't even drive a cow through it. Something tells me we are /i nrhere is II absolutely no intent, at the regional or national level to ac)mmodate the proposals and hopes and aspirations that you represent at the podium today." Jim Chapman Supervisor having a serious problem with getting on the ground and get- ting something done." "There is a serious problem with logging small trees," Wheatley said. "There are high handling costs, basically anything below eight inches is not merchantable. The bio- mass market is terrible right now." But Dahle pointed out some- thing must be done before catastrophic wildfires burn it all down. Dahle asked Wheatley what the board could do this time af- ter so many hours had already gone to waste. "Until we get a different ad- ministration at the higher lev- el," Dahle said, "that is going to say heh, we're going to get out here and do something, we are just wasting a lot of time and effort." District Three Supervisor and Board President Lloyd Keefer echoed Dahle's concern over the lack of logging the sustained yield unit. "It impacts the whole social weU-being of the economy, the local economy," Keefer said. "I hope you can appreciate the frustration that we are going through.." District Two Supervisor Jim Chapman concluded the ef- forts of the local forest officials and other lobbying efforts were not being taken serious- ly. "There is absolutely no in- tent, at the regional or nation- al level," Chapman said, "to accommodate the proposals and hopes and aspirations that you represent at the podium today." Chapman pointed out the re- al issue is the power of the Sierra Club, which has lobbied against any cutting of trees on national forest land. "We've got congressional ac- tion behind us, the appropria- tions," Chapman said, "so we don't have any excuses that we don't have the staffing to get it on the ground. "Which tells me that the Sierra Club has more power in this country than Congress, the district rangers, the boards of supervisors and the people that live in these various com- munities." While the board refused to actively participate in the analysis study, they did ask that the forest service to re- port back every three to six months. $ $1.00 OF Pint for pint blood drive at Moran Hall July 25.26 There will be a Susanville Community Pint for Pint blood drive, Tuesday, July 25, from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. and Wednesday, July 26, from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. at the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Msg. Moran Hall, 140 North Weather- low. Contact Dick Havey at 257-5511 to make your appointment. The drive is sponsored by the Sacred Heart Knights of Columbus and Morning Glory Dairy. With the current trend of fewer and fewer people donating during the summer, United Blood Services is trying to avoid an emergen- cy blood alert. Supply levels are dangerously low and may result in the postponement of non-life threatening surgeries and other med- ical procedures dependent on blood and blood products. We currently are extremely low on all blood types, especially O-positive and blood types. Everyone who is 17] older, weighing at least 110 lbs. make a difference in their The donation process takes an hour. Bring As a non-profit or Services is consistently fective. By scheduling an are helping to ensure that equate number of staff and ment needed to accommodate ty's blood drive. If you have questions rel ty to donate due to medication, (malaria risk areas) or a you can call United Blood 1-8(D-696-4484. All Lassen County food schedule for August com The TEFAP and Brown Bag Food Distribution Schedule for August is as follows: Herlong, TEFAP and Brown Bag: Distribution will be made at 10 a.m. Friday, Aug. 11, at Herlong Communi- ty Center. Eagle Lake, TEFAP and Brown Bag: Distribution will be made Thursday, Aug. I0, at Eagle Lake Community Cen- ter. Westwood, TEFAP Only: Distribution will be made at 1 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 10, at Westwood Senior Center. Termo, TEFAP and Brown Bag: Dis decided. All other County will September: Big Valley, Doyle, Janesville, Susanville. Watch tion schedule. Celebrating 6 years as your local place to for quality brands, price, ;erviq e and 10% OFF Sheriffs De Brown Jum CLEARANCE 00_EDICAL SCRUBS UPTOWN UNIFORMS 718 MAIN ST. * SUSANVILLE * 251-5855 STORE HOURS: NI 9 AM - 5 PM * SAT 10-3 PM ........ OPEN A CREDIT ACCOUNT TODAY \\; COUNTY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION GRAND OPENING CERTIFICATE Available for a limited time only! APY ANNUAL PERCENTAGE YIELD (APY) is effective as of July 12, 2000 and assumes the funds will remain on deposit for 18 months. A $10,000 Minimum opening balance is required. There is a substantial penalty for early withdrawal. Offer good for a limited time. Rates subject to change without notice. Technology is evolving at a rapid pace. Adelphia has a commitment to remain on the ting edge. With this perspective in mind, we have joined forces with technology in of healthcare to help fund cancer research. This month, each time you order Adelphia Cable TV, we21 give the $5 it costs for tion to help fight this killing disease. Your $5 combined with your neighbor's $5 and so and so on...together we can make a difference. For more inlormMion rail 8004264299 Our mission has always been to offer you new technologies combined with superior customer service.